Curriculum

Narrow down what classes you see by selecting from the categories below.

Business

Personal Finance

BS 915: Finance is a one semester course which provides the opportunity to learn everyday “life-skills” including money management, personal recordkeeping, career opportunities and economic risk factors through applications.

  • Mastery of “life skills,” including job interviews, money management and investing
  • Business
International Business

BS 921: The course will provide a foundation for studying international business and will cover aspects of conducting business in the global economy. The student will observe how international businesses are dependent upon various factors such as national economies, societies and cultures.

  • Overview of cultural and political influences on business
  • Knowledge of the import/export business
  • Exposure to the global communications network
  • Business
Career Exploration

BS 925: Students may assist in the Library, Counseling, Advancement, Information Technology and/or Admissions offices. Students will develop organizational and social skills needed for library and office work. Tasks include work appropriate in each office or area. Grading is based on work ethic, conduct, punctuality and participation. Participation covers: demonstrating initiative, accomplishing assignments, working without constant supervision, positive and helpful attitude.

Prerequisites: Counselor, Librarian or other area supervisors’ approval

  • Business
Business and Personal Law

BS 919: This course introduces the fundamentals of business and personal areas of law that are of interest to the student. The course will expose the student to our legal system, forms of business organization, fundamentals of contract law, business ethics, and other legal realms affecting today’s society and students.

  • Exposure to citizens’ legal rights and responsibilities
  • Overview of contract, civil and criminal law
  • Knowledge of the U.S. justice system, including a mock trial and field trip to a courthouse
  • Business

English

  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
English Language Learners II: Listening, Speaking, and Critical Thinking in English

EN 227: Students will listen, watch, research and respond in writing to academic lectures and articles with summaries, opinions and vocabulary development. Students will have the opportunity to participate in class discussions using the Socratic method of discussion. They will prepare speeches of varying lengths to help with pronunciation and build comfort and confidence in public speaking.

  • Emphasis on proficiency in listening and comprehending auditory information
  • Development of confidence in speaking in English with peers and teachers
  • Students will gain skills necessary to build social and professional relationships
  • English
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
English Language Learners I: Listening, Speaking, and Critical Thinking in English

EN 226: Students will listen, watch, research and respond in writing to academic lectures and articles with summaries, opinions and vocabulary development. Students will have the opportunity to participate in class discussions using the Socratic method of discussion. They will prepare speeches of varying lengths to help with pronunciation and build comfort and confidence in public speaking.

  • Emphasis on proficiency in listening and comprehending auditory information
  • Development of confidence in speaking in English with peers and teachers
  • Students will gain skills necessary to build social and professional relationships
  • English
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Standardized Test Preparation

EN 224: This course presents strategies and practices skills for improving standardized test scores. Students will complete and review practice online tests in English, mathematics, reading, and essay writing. They will also review the purposes of the ACT/SAT tests, general test-taking strategies, and ways to reduce test anxiety.

  • One semester course presenting strategies for success on the ACT and TASP tests
  • Inclusion of practice tests, grammar review and reading strategies

Prerequisites: Successful completion of 10th grade English and mathematics.

  • English
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
English Literature and Composition IV: Shakespeare

EN 221: This senior level course provides a year’s study of the works of William Shakespeare. Students will read tragedies: Hamlet, Othello and King Lear; histories: Henry V and Richard III; and comedies: The Tempest, and Much Ado About Nothing. Students will analyze and dissect Shakespeare’s writing and learn vocabulary in context. Coordination of projects with other disciplines is a focus of the course.

  • Shakespeare course develops skills through the reading of Shakespearean plays and sonnets

Prerequisites: English III and recommendation of the English III teacher.

  • English
  • 11th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Advanced Placement
  • Year-Long
Advanced Placement English Language

EN 211: This course provides an in-depth study of U.S. literature. The study of themes in

American literature provides a vehicle for comparison and contrast of the different eras of American thought. The study of grammar, usage, sentence structure, composition, and library and reference tools culminates in the writing of a formal research paper. Students will take the AP English Language Examination in May.

Prerequisites: 86 or higher in Honors English II, meeting benchmark Verbal scores on the PSAT and recommendation of the instructor.

  • Advanced placement course culminates in writing the AP Language and Composition Exam
  • English
  • 1 Credit
  • 9th Grade
  • Year-Long
English I: Foundations In Literature and English Composition

EN 201: English I has been designed to meet the varied skill levels of the ninth grade student. The course includes a strong emphasis on writing skills and vocabulary enrichment. Through the study of literature, the student is also provided an opportunity to develop and strengthen his/her thinking and comprehension skills.

  • Emphasis on reading comprehension, basic writing skills, grammar and vocabulary enrichment
  • English
  • 1 Credit
  • 9th Grade
  • Honors Course
  • Year-Long
Honors English I: Foundations in Literature and English Composition

EN 202: Honors English I provides a comprehensive study of literature in various poetry and prose forms. The study of a wide spectrum of ancient and modern literature emphasizes plot, characterization, theme, setting, figurative language, irony, symbol, analogy, and satire. Through analysis and evaluation, students acquire skills in observation, perception, comparison, and documentation. Formal writing of paragraphs and essays will improve the students’ grammar and sentence structure.

  • Honors course exposes students to a wide spectrum of literature and literary devices, encouraging critical thinking and self-expression

Prerequisites: Entrance examination score of 90 percentile or above and recommendation of the department.

  • English
  • 10th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
English II: Foundations in Literature and English Composition

EN 205: English II extends the study of literary analysis, composition and language. Students improve language skills through the study of vocabulary. Students write a variety of compositions ranging from research essay to essays of literary analysis. Emphasis is placed on the skills of supporting ideas and drawing conclusions.   Students will read, study, discuss and write about major works of literature, including a variety of world and multi-cultural literature.

  • Extension of the study of language, compositions and literary analysis

Prerequisites: English I

  • English
  • 10th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Honors Course
  • Year-Long
Honors English II: Selected Major Works and English Composition

EN 206: In this course students will study selected major works of world literature in great depth and write complex compositions. High order thinking skills will be used in preparation for Advanced Placement English III and IV. Through rigorous academic work, students will acquire the knowledge, concepts, and skills needed to engage in college-level English classes at the junior and senior level in high school.

  • For Honors sophomores, more complex compositions are written
  • Emphasis on higher-level thinking: analysis, synthesis and creativity

Prerequisites: Completion of English I with 95% or higher; completion of Honors English I with 86% or higher; meeting benchmark verbal scores on the PSAT 8/9 and permission of instructor.

  • English
  • 11th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
English III: United States Literature

EN 210: English III explores the development of American literature from colonial times to the present. Literary units are arranged chronologically to study literature in historical context. Composition units offer the student experience in written expression emphasizing appropriate usage and logical thought. Vocabulary includes the study of meaning through context and word analysis.

  • Study of U.S. literature from colonial to modern times, understanding literary selections in their historical context
  • Continued mastery of grammar and vocabulary, with emphasis on choosing synonyms and making correct analogies
  • Course emphasizes the writing of a formal research paper

Prerequisites: English I and II

  • English
  • 11th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
English III: The Challenging Americans

EN 213: Students will read and analyze the challenging works of a wide variety of American authors and columnists including Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams and others.  The students completing this course will write additional types of essays and compositions and focus on critical thinking and analysis. The pace of the course is necessarily faster than English III, and the course will require a substantial amount of additional reading.

  • Reading and study of additional challenging works of major American authors beyond the standard junior college preparatory curriculum
  • Study of U.S. literature from colonial to modern times, understanding literary selections in their historical context
  • Continued mastery of grammar and vocabulary, with emphasis on choosing synonyms and making correct analogies
  • Course emphasizes the writing of a formal research paper

Prerequisites: Recommendation of English II teacher and/or department chair

  • English
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Advanced Placement
  • Year-Long
Advanced Placement English Literature

EN 216: Senior Advanced Placement English Literature provides an in-depth study of literature. The selected texts cover an extensive period of history and provide an opportunity for the student to further develop her/his language abilities. The course includes the study of literary themes, genres, and topics and introduces skills to develop stylistic writing. Students will take the AP English Literature examination in May.

  • Advanced placement course culminates in the AP English Literature Exam

Prerequisites: 88 or above in AP English Language.

  • English
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
English Literature and Composition IV

EN 215: The content of English IV includes British literature, composition theories and practices, vocabulary study, literary forms and terminology, researching topics for presentations, basic reviews of sentence and paragraph structure, English usage and grammar. Three quarters of the year’s study involves literature study to improve comprehension and build historical appreciation of the literature of the English world. One quarter of the year’s work concentrates on writing theories and methods through preparation of a variety of writing projects. Non-fiction reading has been added to the curriculum to promote writing of argumentative essays.

  • Development of appreciation of literature in the English-speaking world throughout history
  • Honing of writing skills, through a variety of papers

Prerequisites: English III

  • English
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Dual Credit
  • Year-Long
English IV Dual Credit

EN 217: This course provides college level instruction in English composition. The syllabus follows the Houston Community College syllabi for English 1301 and English 1302 – English Composition I & II. The course is taught by a St. Pius X faculty member. It requires college level reading and writing ability. Completion of this course earning a “C” or above will earn students 6 hours of college credit which is reflected on the HCC transcript. The course also fulfills the English IV requirement of 1 full credit towards graduation. The course is scheduled during the regular high school hours on the SPX campus. Students living within Houston Community College District – no fee; students living outside the district pay $162.00 to the college.

Prerequisites: ACT Composite score 23 or above with minimum of 19 in English or SAT Composite score 1070 with a minimum of 500 in Critical Reading or qualifying score on Asset test. Qualified students may take a maximum of 6 hours of college credit per semester.

  • English

Computer Science

  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Introduction to Multimedia with Computers

CS 941: This course is designed to study the fundamentals of keyboarding, word processing, spreadsheets, databases, the Internet, and multimedia presentation software. All instruction will take place on networked multimedia computers. Students will be introduced to productivity software packages including Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Publisher and Access. Students will integrate tools from these packages to design a final project.

Software: Edutyping Keyboarding Online, Microsoft Office 2013, PowerPoint 2013

  • Computer Science
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Honors Course
  • Spring
Honors Computer Science II

CS 943: An Honors course designed to study the fundamentals of structured and object-oriented programming. Emphasis is placed on how to divide a problem into manageable parts and think in logical and creative ways to design, write, and debug programs.

Software: Processing, JCreator, and Java

Prerequisites: Computer Science I

  • Computer Science
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Computer Science I

CS 942: This course is designed in introduce students to the “computational thinking” of Computer Science. The goal I is to help students understand the common terminology used in Computer Science. The student is introduced to the elements of program design and implementation, using graphical simulations which resemble computer games although their underpinnings form the basis of computer programming. In a graphical environment, students will learn to create programs which make decisions and respond to keyboard and mouse clicks.

Software: Scratch and Processing (Python)

Prerequisites: Algebra I

  • Computer Science
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Web Page Design

CS 944: This is an introduction to the design, creation, and maintenance of web pages and websites. Students learn how to critically evaluate website quality; learn how to create and maintain quality web pages; learn about web design standards and why they’re important; and learn to create and manipulate images. The course progresses from introductory work on web design to culminating project demonstrating the breadth of web technologies learned throughout the course.

Software: Adobe Photoshop, Microsoft Notepad, and various web browsers

Prerequisites: Multimedia or demonstrated proficiency in keyboarding.

  • Computer Science
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
Video Technology I: Intro to Movie Making

CS 946: Students will be introduced to the production process and team and filming techniques. The topics in this course will include: the production crew, organizing a production, writing for video and film, and shooting techniques. The course provides introductory training in the creation of scripts, storyboards, short films and filming in a variety of environments. Students will learn to film, edit and combine a variety of digital media into one cohesive production. Students will acquire electronic information in a variety of formats including text, audio, video and graphics and learn to cite all sources researched and obtained from the Internet.

  • Computer Science
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Advanced Placement
  • Year-Long
AP Computer Science

CS 948: AP Computer Science emphasizes object-oriented programming methodology with a concentration on problem solving and algorithm development and is meant to be the equivalent of a first-semester college level course in Computer Science. It also includes the study of data structures, design, and abstraction.

Software: JCreator and Java

Prerequisites: Honors Computer Science II and approval of the instructor.

  • Computer Science

Fine Arts

  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • 9th Grade
  • Year-Long
Handbell Choir I, II, III, IV

FA 600: This course is designed to teach students to perform on handbells as an ensemble. They will have opportunities to perform for musical enjoyment at school and community events. Students will develop mental and physical discipline and concentration as well as sight-reading. Many of the current handbell techniques will be learned while playing music from a variety of composers. As skills improve, students will be given the opportunity to perform solos or in small ensembles. This group competes in the TAPPS music competition.

  • Development of musical terminology and handbell techniques
  • Compete in TAPPS in the spring semester
  • Participation in Masses
  • Perform at community events

Prerequisites: Ability to read music and/or count rhythms at the discretion of the director.

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Drawing

FA 704: This course is a continuation of Visual Foundations with an emphasis on drawing. Both the ability to render real and imaginary will be explored. Students will gain a background of art history from each project.

  • Continuation of two-dimensional drawing from Visual Foundations
  • Students will explore a variety of design style including realism, perspective, abstract, collage and non-objective
  • Students will focus on elements of composition

Prerequisites: Visual Foundations or the equivalent, 80 or above

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Auto CAD Drafting

FA 700: Students will explore and receive instruction in basic architecture, engineering, technical theatre, design, art, 3D printing, and many other Computer Aided Design subjects. This course will inspire critical thinking, problem solving, creative thinking and builds math skills. This course will integrate AutoCAD software.

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Visual Foundations

FA 705: This course is designed to give the student a basic understanding and awareness of composition, principles and elements of art. Two-dimensional and three- dimensional forms will be taught.

  • Introductory course, which is designed to provide a basic understanding and awareness of composition in, two dimensional design
  • Art history will be included with each project
  • Mediums including pencil, prisma color, ink, and paint
  • Prerequisite for Drawing, Painting, Sculpture, and Ceramics

Prerequisites: Commitment to excel in artistic abilities

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Spring
Painting

FA 706: This course is a continuation of Visual Foundations with an emphasis on color theory instruction to create a variety of painting styles. Students will gain a background in art history through each project.

  • Continuation of strengthening drawing skills and composition
  • In-depth study of color wheel and blending painting techniques with watercolor, acrylic and oil
  • Painting designs including realism, abstract and non-objective

Prerequisites: Visual Foundations or the equivalent, 80 or above. Permission of instructor

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
Sculpture

FA 708: This course is a continuation of Visual Foundations with an emphasis on three-dimensional art and expression. Drawing skills will be finely tuned while sculptural processes will be introduced through a variety of media. Students will gain a background of art history from each project. Additional supplies are required.

Development of three-dimensional design through a variety of sculptural processes including relief, sculpture in the round, modeling, carving and assembly

Basic techniques using clay, plastic, paper mache and metal

Prerequisites: Visual Foundations or the equivalent, 80 or above.

  • Fine Arts
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Studio Art

FA 714: This course is designed to provide a student the opportunity to build a portfolio. The course is designed to challenge the student’s creativity and ability.

  • Students compose a portfolio of work developing their personal style and design
  • Application of technical knowledge gained from previous art course.  
  • Students must take at least two art classes before permission granted.
  • New skills gained by experimentation and problem solving

Prerequisites: Average grade of 80 or above in Visual Foundations and coursework in selected art field (drawing, painting, ceramics, sculpture and photography) along with written permission from instructor prior to registration. Class size is limited. Additional supplies are required.

  • Fine Arts
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Studio Art II

FA 717: This is a continuation of the Studio Art class. Students will continue to build a portfolio. The course is designed to continue to challenge the student’s creativity and ability.

  • Students compose a portfolio of work developing their personal style and design
  • Application of technical knowledge gained from previous art course. 
  • Students must take at least two art classes before permission granted.
  • New skills gained by experimentation and problem solving

Prerequisites: 80 or above in Visual Foundation, 2 additional art electives, and Studio Art and written permission from the instructor prior to registration.

  • Fine Arts
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Studio Art III

FA 721: This is a continuation of the Studio class. Students will apply the technical knowledge gained from previous art courses in advanced problem solving. New technical skills will be introduced to further enhance the students’ knowledge. The students’ personal interpretation and expression will be emphasized in the class.

  • Students compose a portfolio of work developing their personal style and design
  • Application of technical knowledge gained from previous art course. 
  • Students must take at least two art classes before permission granted.
  • New skills gained by experimentation and problem solving

Prerequisites: 80 or above in Visual Foundation, 2 additional art electives, and Studio Art and written permission from the instructor prior to registration.

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Ceramics

FA 718: Students will continue their exploration of 3-D forms using different types of clay as their medium. History of ceramics from ancient times to modern will be studied. Using the elements and principals of design, the students will develop artworks using additive and subtractive building techniques. Pinch, coil, slab, and wheel thrown work will be introduced. All developed pieces will be kiln fired. Sketchbook required.

  • Exploration of 3-D forms using different types of clay and glazes
  • Techniques such as pinch, coil, slab and wheel-thrown work will be introduced

Prerequisites: 80 or above in Visual Foundations and written permission from the instructor.

  • Fine Arts
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Studio Art IV

FA 722: This is a continuation of the Studio class. Students will apply the technical knowledge gained from previous art courses in advanced problem solving. New technical skills will be introduced to further enhance the students’ knowledge. The students’ personal interpretation and expression will be emphasized in the class.

  • Students compose a portfolio of work developing their personal style and design
  • Application of technical knowledge gained from previous art course. 
  • Students must take at least two art classes before permission granted.
  • New skills gained by experimentation and problem solving

Prerequisites: 80 or above in Visual Foundation, 2 additional art electives, and Studio Art and written permission from the instructor prior to registration.

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Digital Photography

FA 719: Students will learn how to photograph, digitally edit, and print photos using digital cameras, Adobe Photoshop, and ink jet printers. Students are expected to master the fundamental principles of design, lighting, basic digital camera operation, and computer photography software. Students must have a digital camera, work in a program mode; $20 for printing cost for supplies.

  • Basic understanding of digital photography including shooting, downloading, editing, using principles of art: composition, exposure and history of photography
  • Utilization of Photoshop CC2015 to manipulate, edit, correct and create fine art photographs
  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Intermediate Digital Photography

FA 723: Students will learn intermediate photography concepts and increase skills in the use of Adobe Photoshop. They will be introduced to diptychs, triptychs, advanced blending and collage and surreal imagery. They will also study shooting styles including photojournalism and fine art. Students will layer masks and create and use vectors. They will also learn printing and papers. Students will complete photography assignments for the Del Sarto yearbook along with individual projects. Additional time outside of class is needed for successful completion of this course. Students must have a digital camera; $20 for printing cost for supplies.

  • Introduction to diptychs, triptychs, advanced blending, collage and surreal imagery
  • Study of styles including photojournalism and fine art
  • Take pictures for the Del Sarto yearbook

Prerequisites: 80 or above in Digital Photography.

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Photojournalism

FA 724: Students will experience major objectives to include review camera basics and learn about different lenses, ISOs, shutter speeds and aperture. Composition review on rule of third, balance, repetition, etc. Technical quality will entail metering and bracketing. Faster shutter speeds, panning. Digital – preparing a photo for a publication – color correction, cropping, sharpening, burning, dodging, editing, and organizing system. Caption writing – 5 W and H. Different types of photojournalism: news, feature, sports, student life, portraits, Law, and ethics. Digital Camera; Sketchbook required.

  • Yearbook photographers for Del Sarto Yearbook
  • Combines efforts with Del Sarto Yearbook staff to photograph school activities
  • Students will utilize Adobe Photoshop CC2015 to edit photographs

Prerequisites: Digital Photography

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Graphic Design Techniques

FA 720: This course is a continuation of Visual Foundations with an emphasis on visual communications and advertising/print media. Students will focus on projects that are design based and include positive/negative space, color, composition, print, logotypes, layout and typography. Multimedia concepts and studio techniques geared toward a complete visual presentation will be utilized. Sketchbook required.

  • Development of basic design skills with an emphasis on overall impact and presentation
  • Introduction to Adobe InDesign CC2015 and Adobe Photoshop CC2015
  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Acting I

FA 750: Acting I introduces basic acting skills. Knowledge of the areas of the stage and stage blocking will be addressed. Theatre games and improvisations will be an important element of the class to promote quick thinking, spontaneous reactions, and creativity. Vocal development using Lessac Voice training will be incorporated into daily exercises. Projection and enunciation will also be practiced and refined. Understanding how to develop a character from the first reading of a script to developing a walk, a talk, mannerisms, and attitude will be discussed and studied. Students will work on monologues and scenes with classmates to showcase their work.

  • Basic acting skills for classical and contemporary plays
  • Monologue and scene work
  • Character development and script analysis
  • Improvisational games and exercises
  • Voice and diction work-Lessac training
  • Movement exercises including Laban Technique
  • Basic theatre terminology for the Stage
  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Acting II

FA 751: Students will continue their study of acting skills. Both the actor’s and the director’s points of view will be explored. Students will also focus upon the exploration and analysis of dramatic structure and genres. The course includes an introduction to directing.

  • Continuation of skills learned in Acting I
  • Detailed character and script analysis
  • Advanced acting skills from the perspective of historical periods in theatre
  • Performance of works from all periods
  • Mastery of auditioning
  • Understanding of production

Prerequisites: Acting I or permission of instructor

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Technical Theatre

FA 764: Students will understand general principles, techniques, methods, and skills used in theatrical design; which includes costume design and scenic design. Students will read plays and evaluate the scripts, using the script analysis to develop design concepts for costumes and scenic elements. Students are required to attend Theater SPX productions. Illustrate the fundamental skills in representing technical ideas through renderings and model building.

  • Students will have a complete understanding of various aspects of theatrical design. Projects include set and costume design.
  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Technical Theatre II

FA 760: This course offers continued growth in theatrical design; which includes costume design and scenic design. Students will read plays and evaluate the scripts, using the script analysis to develop design concepts for costumes and scenic elements. Students are required to attend Theater SPX productions. Illustrate the fundamental skills in representing technical ideas through renderings and model building.

Prerequisites: Tech Theatre I

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Theatre Arts

FA 761: The study of theater history and basic acting skills are undertaken in this course. Students will be introduced to the basic concepts of theatre arts. Students will use various creative drama techniques to build confidence and trust, stimulate imagination, movement and role-play. Students will research specific genres and periods of theater and will perform both classical and contemporary drama.

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Theatre Production

FA 763: A performance based course for students who apply, audition and/or interview successfully with the Theatre Director. The class is responsible for a majority of production work done by Theatre SPX. It explores auditions, rehearsal, and production schedules. Students are expected to actively contribute to current and upcoming productions and maintain academic eligibility to do so.

Students will participate in a pre-determined number of hours for the main stage productions as either cast, crew, marketing or house

Prerequisites: Auditions, and/or application/interviews and permission of the instructor

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Stagecraft I

FA 765: Students will learn the basics of construction in theatre. This is a “hands-on” course where students will assist in creating set pieces for school productions. Students will learn how to correctly use tools, hardware and materials.

  • This is a hands-on class in which students will learn theatre terms, stage configurations and equipment used in each  theatre production
  • Scenery building of sets for all SPX theatre productions

Prerequisites: Must attend all semester drama Theatre SPX productions. Students must bring their own change of clothes for work in class.

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Stagecraft II

FA 766: Students will learn the basics of construction in theatre. This is a “hands-on” course where students will assist in creating set pieces for school productions. Students will learn how to correctly use tools, hardware and materials.

  • This is a hands-on class in which students will continue their study of scenery building of sets for all SPX theatre productions                            

Prerequisites: Stagecraft I with a grade of 80% or better in Stagecraft I and permission of the instructor required – must attend all semester Theatre SPX productions. Students must provide their own change of clothes to for work in class.

  • Fine Arts
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Stagecraft III & IV

FA 768: Students will learn the basics of construction in theatre. This is a “hands-on” course where students will assist in creating set pieces for school productions. Students will learn how to correctly use tools, hardware and materials. Students will be held responsible for being crew leaders in class.

  • This is a hands-on class in which students will continue their study of scenery building of sets for all SPX theatre productions                            

Prerequisites: Stagecraft I & II with a grade of 85% or better in Stagecraft II and recommendation from the instructor is required– Must attend all semester Theatre SPX productions. Students must provide their own change of clothes to work in.

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • 9th Grade
  • Year-Long
Band I

FA 770: This course is designed to teach students to perform on a as an ensemble and/or soloist. They will have opportunities to perform for musical enjoyment at school and community events. Students will develop mental and physical discipline, concentration and memorization skills. Students learn to play music of different composers and different styles. They are provided opportunities to develop responsibility, gain knowledge of band literature, and improve technical proficiency and creative self-expression both individually and as group participants. 1/2 PE or Fine Arts credit given for marching band for fall semester only.

  • Development of musical technical proficiency and creative self-expression
  • Marching band promotes school spirit during the fall semester, playing at all home games, pep rallies
  • Award-winning concert band in spring, entering group, solo and small ensemble competitions
  • Students may enroll as a musician, flag corps member or twirler
  • PE credit may be earned for three consecutive years during the fall semester

Prerequisites: Beginning skills on an instrument. Marching and concert uniforms provided by the school Band t-shirts/shorts/socks. Rehearsals are scheduled before and after school.

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
Band II

FA 771: This course is designed to teach students to perform on a as an ensemble and/or soloist. They will have opportunities to perform for musical enjoyment at school and community events. Students will develop mental and physical discipline, concentration and memorization skills. Students learn to play music of different composers and different styles. They are provided opportunities to develop responsibility, gain knowledge of band literature, and improve technical proficiency and creative self-expression both individually and as group participants. 1/2 PE or Fine Arts credit given for marching band for fall semester only.

  • Development of musical technical proficiency and creative self-expression
  • Marching band promotes school spirit during the fall semester, playing at all home games, pep rallies
  • Award-winning concert band in spring, entering group, solo and small ensemble competitions
  • Students may enroll as a musician, flag corps member or twirler
  • PE credit may be earned for three consecutive years during the fall semester

Prerequisites: Band I. Marching and concert uniforms provided by the school Band t-shirts/shorts/socks. Rehearsals are scheduled before and after school.

  • Fine Arts
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Band III

FA 772: This course is designed to teach students to perform on a as an ensemble and/or soloist. They will have opportunities to perform for musical enjoyment at school and community events. Students will develop mental and physical discipline, concentration and memorization skills. Students learn to play music of different composers and different styles. They are provided opportunities to develop responsibility, gain knowledge of band literature, and improve technical proficiency and creative self-expression both individually and as group participants. 1/2 PE or Fine Arts credit given for marching band for fall semester only.

  • Development of musical technical proficiency and creative self-expression
  • Marching band promotes school spirit during the fall semester, playing at all home games, pep rallies
  • Award-winning concert band in spring, entering group, solo and small ensemble competitions
  • Students may enroll as a musician, flag corps member or twirler
  • PE credit may be earned for three consecutive years during the fall semester

Prerequisites: Band II. Marching and concert uniforms provided by the school Band t-shirts/shorts/socks. Rehearsals are scheduled before and after school.

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Beginning Band

FA 774: Designed for students with an interest in learning to play an instrument in the band with little or no previous music instruction. Students will learn introductory skills on a variety of instruments and begin to learn to read music.

Prerequisites: Students will need access to the instrument of their choice through purchase or rental from outside sources.

  • Fine Arts
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Band IV

FA 773: This course is designed to teach students to perform on a as an ensemble and/or soloist. They will have opportunities to perform for musical enjoyment at school and community events. Students will develop mental and physical discipline, concentration and memorization skills. Students learn to play music of different composers and different styles. They are provided opportunities to develop responsibility, gain knowledge of band literature, and improve technical proficiency and creative self-expression both individually and as group participants. 1/2 PE or Fine Arts credit given for marching band for fall semester only.

  • Development of musical technical proficiency and creative self-expression
  • Marching band promotes school spirit during the fall semester, playing at all home games, pep rallies
  • Award-winning concert band in spring, entering group, solo and small ensemble competitions
  • Students may enroll as a musician, flag corps member or twirler
  • PE credit may be earned for three consecutive years during the fall semester

Prerequisites: Band III. Marching and concert uniforms provided by the school Band t-shirts/shorts/socks. Rehearsals are scheduled before and after school.

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • 9th Grade
  • Year-Long
Percussion

FA 776: Students who play percussion in the SPX Band will study all the instruments in the percussion section including the drumline instruments. Students will perform with the SPX Marching Band and Concert Band. Percussion students will attend the TAPPS State Drumline Contest, TPSMEA Marching Contest, all football games and pep rallies, TAPPS State Solo and Ensemble Contest, TPSMEA Solo and Ensemble Contest, TAPPS State Concert and Sight-reading Contest and all concerts at school and around the community. 1/2 credit PE or Fine Arts given in fall semester only.

Prerequisites: Students need to be in Band I, II, III, or IV, or have Director’s approval.

  • Fine Arts
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Music Appreciation

FA 779: A general survey of music literature. We will study different periods of music using composers and their works through recordings, videos and live performances. In music appreciation, you will also learn the history of music from the early ages to present day. You'll also discuss how music effects society and the value it holds with the human population. How music was first created and has changed over time will be studied as you explore music in every genre.

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Dance I

FA 780: Students will learn applicable dance vocabulary. Students will acquire fundamental skills in ballet, lyrical, Hip Hop jazz, modern dance, tap, and much more! Students will explore creative expression through movement and develop awareness of space, time, force and energy. Self-confidence will be developed through use of the body as an expressive instrument in class and in an end of term performance in the spring. 1/2 credit PE or Fine Arts given in fall semester only.

  • Introductory course on various partner, group, and solo dances
  • Provides exposure to and practice in combining movements with music

Prerequisites: Students will need participation attire including leotard, tights, t-shirt and appropriate shoes.

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Dance II

FA 781: Continuation of Dance I with an emphasis on more Honors material. Faster paced course with more attention to details of ballet, modern, jazz, and tap dance techniques. Students will learn applicable dance vocabulary. Students will acquire fundamental skills in ballet, modern, jazz and tap dancing. Students will explore creative expression through movement and develop awareness of space, time, force and energy. Self-confidence will be developed through use of the body as an expressive instrument. 1/2 credit PE or Fine Arts given in fall semester only.

  • Introductory course on various partner, group, and solo dances
  • Provides exposure to and practice in combining movements with music

Prerequisites: Dance I. Students will need participation attire including leotard, tights, t-shirt and appropriate shoes.

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Chorus IA (Fall) IB (Spring)

FA 790: This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental vocal music skills and active music making including mastery of skills and artistry. The vocal ensemble is trained in the classical Belle Canto style of music and includes interpretation and performance of a variety of music literature from Baroque to Broadway. Choristers participate and are graded on their participation in the production of winter concerts, holiday concerts, fall pop shows, and liturgical music ministry service. Emphasis will be placed on the discipline of the mental tools of creativity, communication, critical assessment, and commitment. Chorus may be taken for no credit upon signing official waiver. The vocal ensembles and choristers compete annually each spring in the TAPPS Solo and Ensemble music competition.

  • Focus on choral balance and musical expression
  • Solo and ensemble competitions and concert performances
  • Musical contributions to school liturgies and other music ministry opportunities

Prerequisites: Each chorister is responsible for purchase of his/her uniform – female $90, male $125 (may be deferred by scholarship and/or fundraising).

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Chorus IIA (Fall) IIB (Spring)

FA 791: This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental vocal music skills and active music making including mastery of skills and artistry. The vocal ensemble is trained in the classical Belle Canto style of music and includes interpretation and performance of a variety of music literature from Baroque to Broadway. Choristers participate and are graded on their participation in the production of winter concerts, holiday concerts, fall pop shows, and liturgical music ministry service. Emphasis will be placed on the discipline of the mental tools of creativity, communication, critical assessment, and commitment. Chorus may be taken for no credit upon signing official waiver. The vocal ensembles and choristers compete annually each spring in the TAPPS Solo and Ensemble music competition.

  • Focus on choral balance and musical expression
  • Solo and ensemble competitions and concert performances
  • Musical contributions to school liturgies and other music ministry opportunities

Prerequisites: Chorus IA or IB or permission of the choirmaster. Each chorister is responsible for purchase of his/her uniform –female $90, male $125 (may be deferred by scholarship and/or fundraising).

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Chorus IIIA (Fall) IIIB (Spring)

FA 794: This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental vocal music skills and active music making including mastery of skills and artistry. The vocal ensemble is trained in the classical Belle Canto style of music and includes interpretation and performance of a variety of music literature from Baroque to Broadway. Choristers participate and are graded on their participation in the production of winter concerts, holiday concerts, fall pop shows, and liturgical music ministry service. Emphasis will be placed on the discipline of the mental tools of creativity, communication, critical assessment, and commitment. Chorus may be taken for no credit upon signing official waiver. The vocal ensembles and choristers compete annually each spring in the TAPPS Solo and Ensemble music competition.

  • Focus on choral balance and musical expression
  • Solo and ensemble competitions and concert performances
  • Musical contributions to school liturgies and other music ministry opportunities

Prerequisites: Chorus IIA or IIB or permission of the choirmaster. Each chorister is responsible for purchase of his/her uniform – female $90, male $125 (may be deferred by scholarship and/or fundraising).

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Chorus IVA (Fall) IVB (Spring)

FA 795: This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental vocal music skills and active music making including mastery of skills and artistry. The vocal ensemble is trained in the classical Belle Canto style of music and includes interpretation and performance of a variety of music literature from Baroque to Broadway. Choristers participate and are graded on their participation in the production of winter concerts, holiday concerts, fall pop shows, and liturgical music ministry service. Emphasis will be placed on the discipline of the mental tools of creativity, communication, critical assessment, and commitment. Chorus may be taken for no credit upon signing official waiver. The vocal ensembles and choristers compete annually each spring in the TAPPS Solo and Ensemble music competition.

Focus on choral balance and musical expression

Solo and ensemble competitions and concert performances

Musical contributions to school liturgies and other music ministry opportunities

Prerequisites: Chorus IIIA or IIIB or permission of the choirmaster. Each chorister is responsible for purchase of his/her uniform - female $90, male $125 (may be deferred by scholarship and/or fundraising).

  • Fine Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Campus Singers I

FA 800: This course is designed for the performing musician of Honors musicality. The vocal ensemble is trained in the classical Belle Canto and musical comedy style of interpretation and performance of a variety of music literature including classical repertoire as well as show tunes from Broadway to Hollywood. Singers participate and are graded on their participation in the production of winter concerts, holiday concerts, fall pop shows, and liturgical music ministry service. The vocal ensembles and choristers compete annually each spring in the TAPPS Solo and Ensemble music competition. Emphasis will be placed upon the discipline of the mental tools of creativity, communication, critical assessment, and commitment.

  • Focus on choral balance and musical expression
  • Solo and ensemble competitions and concert performances
  • Pop performances and musical contributions to school liturgies and other music ministry opportunities
  • By audition only for grades 10-12

Prerequisites: Previous choral participation at SPX or another secondary school or permission of the choirmaster. Students must audition for placement in the course prior to spring registration and before the end of school the preceding year. Incoming transfer students may audition in the summer by appointment. Uniform fees – female concert $90 and pop $150, male concert $125 and pop $75 (may be deferred by partial/full scholarship and/or payment plan; some pop sizes available for rent @ $35.00).

  • Fine Arts
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Campus Singers II

FA 801: This course is designed for the performing musician of Honors musicality. The vocal ensemble is trained in the classical Belle Canto and musical comedy style of interpretation and performance of a variety of music literature including classical repertoire as well as show tunes from Broadway to Hollywood. Singers participate and are graded on their participation in the production of winter concerts, holiday concerts, fall pop shows, and liturgical music ministry service. The vocal ensembles and choristers compete annually each spring in the TAPPS Solo and Ensemble music competition. Emphasis will be placed upon the discipline of the mental tools of creativity, communication, critical assessment, and commitment.

  • Focus on choral balance and musical expression
  • Solo and ensemble competitions and concert performances
  • Pop performances and musical contributions to school liturgies and other music ministry opportunities
  • By audition only for grades 10-12

Prerequisites: Previous choral participation at SPX or another secondary school or permission of the choirmaster. Students must audition for placement in the course prior to spring registration and before the end of school the preceding year. Incoming transfer students may audition in the summer by appointment. Uniform fees – female concert $90 and pop $150, male concert $125 and pop $75 (may be deferred by partial/full scholarship and/or payment plan; some pop sizes available for rent @ $35.00).

  • Fine Arts
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Campus Singers III

FA 803: This course is designed for the performing musician of Honors musicality. The vocal ensemble is trained in the classical Belle Canto and musical comedy style of interpretation and performance of a variety of music literature including classical repertoire as well as show tunes from Broadway to Hollywood. Singers participate and are graded on their participation in the production of winter concerts, holiday concerts, fall pop shows, and liturgical music ministry service. The vocal ensembles and choristers compete annually each spring in the TAPPS Solo and Ensemble music competition. Emphasis will be placed upon the discipline of the mental tools of creativity, communication, critical assessment, and commitment.

  • Focus on choral balance and musical expression
  • Solo and ensemble competitions and concert performances
  • Pop performances and musical contributions to school liturgies and other music ministry opportunities
  • By audition only for grades 10-12

Prerequisites: Previous choral participation at SPX or another secondary school or permission of the choirmaster. Students must audition for placement in the course prior to spring registration and before the end of school the preceding year. Incoming transfer students may audition in the summer by appointment. Uniform fees – female concert $90 and pop $150, male concert $125 and pop $75 (may be deferred by partial/full scholarship and/or payment plan; some pop sizes available for rent @ $35.00).

  • Fine Arts

Foreign Language

  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • 9th Grade
  • Year-Long
French I

FL 301: This introductory course exposes students to the language and cultures of the French-speaking world. Students will develop basic proficiency in the four modalities of language learning: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will first learn to communicate about themselves, their families, and their friends. Then, students will respond to oral and written prompts about their daily lives, responsibilities, and favorite restaurants. There is a strong emphasis on vocabulary acquisition and verb conjugation at this level. French will be used as much as possible during classroom instruction.

  • Introduction to the language of choice
  • Basic vocabulary, pronunciation and grammar instruction
  • Study of cultural differences

 

Prerequisites: Recommendation of Admissions Committee or department

  • Foreign Language
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • 9th Grade
  • Year-Long
French II

FL 302: Students will continue to develop proficiency in the four modalities of language learning: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will begin to use the language practically and creatively to make inquiries, gather information, and express opinions. Students will begin to hold conversation on topics ranging from holiday gatherings and food to daily routines and academic choices. They will begin to discuss and analyze fairytales and poems. Students will be introduced to a broad- range of grammatical topics and continue to expand their vocabulary base increase the number and type of situations in which they can function. His class will be conducted mostly in French.

  • Review of the foundations learned during the first year
  • New vocabulary, more complex grammatical structures
  • Movement toward more effective speaking and writing

Prerequisites: French I

  • Foreign Language
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Honors Course
  • Year-Long
Honors French III

FL 303: Students will continue to use the language practically and creatively to complete a variety of tasks including listening, speaking, reading and writing. Themes to be explored include vacation and leisure activities, education and career choices, childhood memories, relationships, the environment, and art within the francophone world. More complex grammatical concepts are introduced. This course will be conducted in French.

  • Integration of culture, conversation, grammar and literature

Prerequisites: French II, B or above and teacher recommendation

  • Foreign Language
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Honors Course
  • Year-Long
Honors French IV

FL 304: Students explore the French and Francophone worlds through six themes (family and community, science and technology, art, contemporary life, global challenges, environment). Students will also study the novel Le Petit Prince from St. Exupery. All students are expected to participate in class discussions. Evaluation is based upon regular assignments and oral presentations, as well as oral and written quizzes and essays. Students will be using more advanced grammar conventions. This course is conducted entirely in French.

  • Continued integration of culture, conversation, grammar and more advanced literature

Prerequisites: French III, B or above and teacher recommendation

  • Foreign Language
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • 9th Grade
  • Year-Long
Latin I

FL 311: In this course students learn the structure and vocabulary of the language from which most modern European languages have derived. Mastery of Latin grammar and vocabulary aids understanding and improves writing of the English language. Exposure to Latin provides strong skills for college entrance exams along with preparation for the terminology of science, law and medicine.

  • Introduction to the language of choice
  • Basic vocabulary, pronunciation and grammar instruction
  • Study of cultural differences

Prerequisites: Recommendation of Admissions Committee or department

  • Foreign Language
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Latin II

FL 312: This course reviews the Latin vocabulary and syntax learned in the first year. It introduces new grammatical forms and vocabulary enabling the student to translate interesting, original Latin texts during the second semester.

  • Review of the foundations learned during the first year
  • New vocabulary, more complex grammatical structures
  • Movement toward more effective speaking and writing

Prerequisites: Latin I

  • Foreign Language
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Advanced Placement
  • Year-Long
Advanced Placement Latin: Vergil & Caesar

FL 316: The goals of the AP Latin: Vergil and Casear course conform to college Latin studies in the fourth through sixth semesters. The basic objective is progress in reading, translating, understanding, analyzing, and interpreting Latin using Julius Caesar’s Gallic Wars and Vergil’s Aeneid.

 Yearlong courses that help prepare students to take the AP Spanish or Latin exam for college credit hours

Prerequisites: Honors Latin III, instructor approval

  • Foreign Language
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Honors Course
  • Year-Long
Honors Latin III

FL 313: Grammar will be reviewed, new vocabulary will be introduced, and a variety of prose authors, both historical and literary will be studied.   In preparation for Latin IV AP, student will read Julius Caesar, Cicero, and other authors as well as be introduced to Latin Poetry through Vergil, Catullus and Horace.

  • Integration of culture, conversation, grammar and literature

Prerequisites: Latin I, Latin II and teacher recommendation.

  • Foreign Language
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • 9th Grade
  • Year-Long
Spanish I

FL 317: Spanish I is the foundation course for students who have not taken Spanish previously and/or for those who have had limited instruction in the language. The basic structures of the language are introduced, reinforced, and practiced. Hispanic culture and history are integrated into the lessons regularly.

  • Introduction to the language of choice
  • Basic vocabulary, pronunciation and grammar instruction
  • Study of cultural differences
  • Foreign Language
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • 9th Grade
  • Year-Long
Spanish II

FL 321: This course develops fluency in spoken and written Spanish through daily translation, interaction with new vocabulary and verb drills. Almost all aspects of Spanish grammar are taught and reviewed. Students are given the opportunities to see, hear, speak and write the language. CD’s and video presentations as well as workbook pages are used to reinforce each objective covered.

  • Review of the foundations learned during the first year
  • New vocabulary, more complex grammatical structures
  • Movement toward more effective speaking and writing

Prerequisites: Spanish I

  • Foreign Language
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Spanish III

FL 324: Spanish III is a fine-tuning of the total system of communication. At this level, emphasis is placed upon acquisition of oral skills, while perfecting and understanding grammatical constructions.

  • Integration of culture, conversation, grammar and literature

Prerequisites: 84 or above in Spanish II and teacher recommendation

  • Foreign Language
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Honors Course
  • Year-Long
Honors Spanish III

FL 325: Spanish III is a fine-tuning of communication skills in the language. The emphasis is placed upon acquisition of oral skills while perfecting and understanding additional advanced grammatical constructions.  Students will be introduced to Spanish literature through poetry, skits, film, and chapters of selected works.

  • Integration of culture, conversation, grammar and literature

Prerequisites: 90 or above in Spanish II and recommendation by the teacher.

  • Foreign Language
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Honors Course
  • Year-Long
Honors Spanish IV

FL 326: Students will increase their vocabulary, gain fluency in speaking, listening, reading and writing, and practice using more complex grammatical structures. Students will be exposed to Spanish poetry and prose and will be able to demonstrate their oral language acquisition through skits and oral presentation. The internet is used frequently for further practice of skills.

  • Continued integration of culture, conversation, grammar and more advanced literature

Prerequisites: 80 or above in Honors Spanish III or 90 or above in Spanish III and teacher recommendation

  • Foreign Language
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Advanced Placement
  • Year-Long
Advanced Placement Spanish Language

FL 327: The AP program in Spanish language is intended for those who have chosen to develop their proficiency in all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course covers the equivalent of a third-year college course in Advanced Spanish writing and conversation. It encompasses aural/oral skills, reading comprehension, grammar, and composition. Students will take the Advanced Placement Exam in May after completing this course.

  • Yearlong courses that help prepare students to take the AP Spanish or Latin exam for college credit hours

Prerequisites: 80% or better in Honors Spanish III or IV or 90% or better in Spanish III or IV and teacher recommendation

  • Foreign Language
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Dual Credit
  • Year-Long
Spanish Dual Credit

FL 331: This course provides college level instruction in Spanish. The syllabus follows the Houston Community College (HCC) syllabi for Spanish 1411 and Spanish 1412. The course is taught by a St. Pius X faculty member. It requires college level reading and writing ability. Completion of this course earning a “C” or above will earn students 6 hours of college credit which is reflected on the HCC transcript. The course also fulfills the Spanish IV requirement of 1 full credit towards graduation. The course is scheduled during the regular high school hours on the SPX campus.

Prerequisites: ACT Composite score of 23 or above with a minimum of 19 in English or SAT Composite score of 1070 with a minimum of 500 in Critical Reading or qualifying score on Assessment test. Qualified students may take a maximum of 6 hours of college credit per semester.

  • Foreign Language
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Spanish IV

FL 328: This course teaches conversation, grammar and composition and prepares the student to pass the language tests for college placement and/or credit. Students will improve their vocabulary through skits, poetry and selected readings. Usage of the Internet will help students further practice their language skills.

  • Continued integration of culture, conversation, grammar and more advanced literature

Prerequisites: 80 or above in Spanish III and teacher recommendation

  • Foreign Language

Language Arts

  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Debate II

LA 246: Forensics prepares students to be successful in a variety of competitive speech/drama events offered in TAPPS, TFA and National Forensics League tournaments. Students will research in preparation for events such as Lincoln- Douglas Debate and extemporaneous speaking. They will learn argumentation which requires critical thinking and improves writing.

Prerequisites: Debate I

  • Language Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Debate I

LA 245: Forensics prepares students to be successful in a variety of competitive speech/drama events offered in TAPPS, TFA and National Forensics League tournaments. Students will research in preparation for events such as Lincoln- Douglas Debate and Original Oratory. They will learn argumentation which requires critical thinking and improves writing.

  • Language Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Communications

LA 241: Students will identify, analyze, develop and evaluate communication skills needed for success. The course will focus on relationships in interpersonal and intrapersonal communication, small groups, and public speaking. Students will learn to employ appropriate verbal and non-verbal communication. Units on group dynamics and listening skills will give students the skills to participate in classes, larger audiences, on teams and in small groups. Students apply skills presenting speeches, working in groups and completing projects during the semester.

  • An introduction to oral communication skills, training students to handle a variety of communication situations and to present themselves in a positive way
  • Study of voice development, verbal and nonverbal communication, and persuasive and informative speaking
  • Language Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Yearbook I

LA 260: Students learn the skills needed to produce an exciting, creative, and meaningful memory book for the school year.  Students will collaborate as they learn desk top publishing and journalism. Some Saturday workshops are required. This course will fulfill Fine Art requirement.

  • Introduction to journalistic writing, copy editing, design/layout, photography and desktop publishing
  • Students produce a press-ready yearbook using state-of-the-art software and hardware
  • Students use Adobe InDesign, CS4
  • Language Arts
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Yearbook II

LA 262: Those enrolling in Yearbook II lead the staff in publishing the Del Sarto annual. Developing a unified theme, students create a plan for the book and execute it to meet deadlines. They also use design, writing and editing skills to ensure the book’s quality. Some Saturday workshops are required.

  • Refinement of journalistic skills and staff management/editorial training in yearbook production
  • Language Arts
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Yearbook III

LA 263: Yearbook III students, with two years of staff and production experience on the Del Sarto publication, assume leadership positions. They will assist with the training and supervision of students in publishing techniques and production, especially layout development, story writing, photography, and marketing. In a supervisory capacity, the students will coordinate all aspects of production, marketing, and editing with the students (staff), section editors, and editors-in-chief. Some Saturday workshops are required.

  • Refinement of journalistic skills and staff management/editorial training in yearbook production
  • Language Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Broadcast Journalism I

LA 271: Broadcast Journalism will provide students with the skills and knowledge to be informed consumers of media in a technological society. The course provides the opportunity for student to learn basic journalistic and technological skills to be used in career choices and television productions.

  • Language Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Broadcast Journalism II

LA 273: This class will utilize the skills learned in Broadcast Journalism I to create news and feature stories for SPX News Announcements and SPX News Online. Emphasis will be placed on the area the student wants to further develop their skills (on camera, camera, writing/producing). Students will leave the class with a portfolio of work for college or professional use.

Prerequisites: Broadcast Journalism I

  • Language Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Academic Strategies II

LA 278: In this course students will be provided the opportunity to develop mastery of skills in self-motivation that emphasize setting personal goals, monitoring performance, making adjustments when necessary and assuming responsibility for oneself as it applies to learning. In this class, the student will receive instruction and support in organization skill building, study techniques, and the identification of personal learning style.

Prerequisites: Academic Strategies I or permission of the Learning Center Director

  • Language Arts
  • 1 Credit
  • 9th Grade
  • Year-Long
Academic Strategies I

LA 276: This course provides students an opportunity to practice skills and process information in order to succeed in college preparatory classes. The course will include strategies for a variety of disciplinary areas including English, mathematics, science, social studies and others. The course emphasizes the development and application of learning strategies suited to the student and the courses in which he/she is enrolled. Students will work with the teacher to devise strategies and schedules for monitoring grades and accessing the tutorial program of the school.

Prerequisites: Recommendation of the Learning Center Director/Admissions Committee

  • Language Arts
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Academic Strategies IV

LA 285: In this course students will be provided the opportunity to develop mastery of skills in self-motivation that emphasize setting personal goals, monitoring performance, making adjustments when necessary and assuming responsibility for oneself as it applies to learning. In this class, the student will receive instruction and support in organization skill building, study techniques, and the identification of personal learning style.

Prerequisites: Academic Strategies III or permission of the Learning Center Director

  • Language Arts
  • 11th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Academic Strategies III

LA 284: In this course students will be provided the opportunity to develop mastery of skills in self-motivation that emphasize setting personal goals, monitoring performance, making adjustments when necessary and assuming responsibility for oneself as it applies to learning. In this class, the student will receive instruction and support in organization skill building, study techniques, and the identification of personal learning style.

Prerequisites: Academic Strategies II or permission of the Learning Center Director

  • Language Arts
  • 1 Credit
  • 9th Grade
  • Year-Long
Reading/Writing Development I

LA 282: This course utilizes READ 180, an engaging and effective research-based reading program which includes curriculum, instruction and assessments to raise reading achievement. Students will benefit from use of technology and individualized instruction to improve their reading levels. The class will include works of fiction and non-fiction in a multimedia program that blends teacher instruction with technology to help students. High interest videos help student build mental models followed with customized reading instruction and practice.

  • Scholastic’s READ 180 intervention program is designed to engage struggling students of all ages with a unique and comprehensive program to improve reading skills.
  • Based on 15 years of research and results, READ 180 provides flexible instruction that complements each student’s individual needs.
  • Students participate in whole-group instruction, instructional software, small group instruction, and independent reading.
  • Students will gain skills necessary for succeeding in English classes, including reading comprehension, vocabulary, grammar and writing.

Prerequisites: Recommendation of Admissions Committee based on entrance examination scores, additional reading testing, prior grades, and teacher recommendations.

  • Language Arts
  • 10th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Reading/Writing Development II

LA 283: The course continues use of the READ 180 program at the student’s individual level in order to build comprehension and fluency and improve writing skills. The course individualizes and adjusts support to address each student’s needs. The course gives students the opportunity to build critical reading skills, vocabulary, writing, 21st Century learning and grammar skills.

  • Scholastic’s READ 180 intervention program is designed to engage struggling students of all ages with a unique and comprehensive program to improve reading skills.
  • Based on 15 years of research and results, READ 180 provides flexible instruction that complements each student’s individual needs.
  • Students participate in whole-group instruction, instructional software, small group instruction, and independent reading.
  • Students will gain skills necessary for succeeding in English classes, including reading comprehension, vocabulary, grammar and writing.

Prerequisites: Students who have tested and qualify, or Reading I

  • Language Arts

Mathematics

  • 1 Credit
  • 9th Grade
  • Year-Long
Algebra I

MT 400: This is a standard program in algebra for average and above average students. It provides a strong base for college-bound students. Use of Graphing Calculator TI 84 Plus or TI 84 Plus C.

  • Properties of real numbers, working with variables
  • Writing, solving, and graphing linear equations and their applications
  • Working with exponents and polynomials
  • Factoring and solving quadratic equations and their applications

Prerequisites: Average proficiency or above on the St. Pius X entrance examination; recommendation of eighth grade mathematics instructor with a grade of 75 or above and/or successful completion of St. Pius X summer Study for Success course with the approval of the Academic Dean and /or the Mathematics Department chair, or appropriate level of achievement on the SPX placement exam.

  • Mathematics
  • 2 Credits
  • 9th Grade
  • Year-Long
Algebra I with Lab

MT 401, MT 401L: This is a double-block class which provides in-depth support for students who may have gaps in math skills or struggled in math in the past.  This support includes using a self-paced computer program to help learn concepts that have been missed; using manipulatives; and having more in-class work time with observation. Use of Graphing Calculator TI 84 Plus or TI 84 Plus C.

  • Properties of real numbers, working with variables
  • Writing, solving, and graphing linear equations and their applications
  • Working with exponents and polynomials
  • Factoring and solving quadratic equations and their applications
  • Algebra I with Algebra Lab is designed for those who have struggled in math or have holes in their backgrounds. It is a double-block class and includes working with a self-paced computer program.

Prerequisites: Recommendation by mathematics department, based on diagnostic test and observation in Study for Success summer class.

  • Mathematics
  • 1 Credit
  • 9th Grade
  • Honors Course
  • Year-Long
Honors Algebra I

MT 406: This course provides an accelerated, comprehensive overview of Algebra I with an introduction to geometry. It is designed for the college-bound student who enjoys mathematics and who has displayed procedural and problem solving skills. Both quantity and complexity of problems are higher than those found in a standard algebra course. The approach is more theoretical. Use of Graphing Calculator TI 84 Plus or TI 84 Plus C.

  • Properties of real numbers, working with variables
  • Writing, solving, and graphing linear equations and their applications
  • Working with exponents and polynomials
  • Factoring and solving quadratic equations and their applications
  • Honors involves higher-level problems and an introduction to Algebra II concepts

Prerequisites: Entrance examination score at or above the 90th percentile in mathematical concepts and skills, overall composite at or above the 90th percentile and recommendation of eighth grade mathematics instructor and the St. Pius X department chair. Students who score below the 90th percentile, and/or who have completed an eighth grade course in Algebra I and wish placement in this course, must take the St. Pius X Placement Examination held in April.

  • Mathematics
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • 9th Grade
  • Year-Long
Geometry

MT 410: This is a college-preparatory course, designed to develop an understanding of geometric relations in a plane and in space.

  • Introduction to inductive and deductive reasoning in mathematical and non-mathematical situations
  • Study of planar and spatial relationships
  • Continued emphasis on vocabulary and mathematical relationships
  • Introduction to trigonometry

Prerequisites: Algebra I or Honors Algebra I

  • Mathematics
  • 10th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • 9th Grade
  • Honors Course
  • Year-Long
Honors Geometry/Trigonometry

MT 411: This course presents an accelerated, comprehensive survey of planar and spatial geometric relationships. Designed for the college bound student with exceptional mathematical and critical/analytical ability, students enrolling in this course should have the desire to move beyond the scope of the normal college preparatory curriculum. Appropriate technology including the graphing calculator, is used to explore the geometric and trigonometric relationships. Students in this course will complete independent or group projects on topics not covered in a regular geometry course. Use of Graphing Calculator TI 84 Plus or TI 84 Plus C.

  • Introduction to inductive and deductive reasoning in mathematical and non-mathematical situations
  • Study of planar and spatial relationships
  • Continued emphasis on vocabulary and mathematical relationships
  • More in-depth introduction to trigonometry

Prerequisites: 80 or better in the second semester of Honors Algebra I, or 98 or better in the second semester of Algebra I with approval of department chairperson. Students who have completed Algebra I and/or Geometry in eighth grade, and who wish placement in this course, must take the St. Pius X Mathematics Placement Examination in April. Department chair approval is required for this course.

  • Mathematics
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Algebra II

MT 420: This course provides a thorough review of Algebra I and begins a detailed study of irrational and complex numbers, quadratic equations, systems of equations, relations and functions, graphing techniques and graphical analysis. Use of Graphing Calculator TI 84 Plus or TI 84 Plus C.

Solution of linear and quadratic equations

Study of matrix operations, linear programming and statistical analysis

Prerequisites: 1 credit in Geometry (or concurrent enrollment), a grade of 75 or higher in the 2nd semester of Algebra I, and/or permission of the department chair. NOTE: Students who earned a grade of 74 or below in the second semester of Algebra I may enroll in Algebra II, under contract, with the approval of the department chair, and contingent upon successful completion of the summer refresher seminar in basic algebraic skills and concepts.

  • Mathematics
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Honors Course
  • Year-Long
Honors Algebra II

MT 423: This course provides an accelerated, comprehensive program for college-bound students with exceptional ability. It covers all material found in the standard college-preparatory Algebra II course, and is expanded to include some Pre-calculus topics. Use of Graphing Calculator TI 84 Plus or TI 84 Plus C.

  • Solution of linear and quadratic equations
  • Study of matrix operations, linear programming and statistical analysis

Prerequisites: Department chair approval is required. Sophomores must have completed or be enrolled concurrently in Honors Geometry. Juniors must have earned a grade of 80 or better in Honors Geometry, and a grade of 80 or better in the last semester of Honors Algebra I. Juniors having earned a grade of 98 or better in the second semester of Algebra I or Geometry may seek approval to enroll in this course.

  • Mathematics
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
College Algebra/Trigonometry

MT 425: This course includes topics from advanced algebra and trigonometry and is designed for students intending to go to college, but not ready for pre-calculus. Graphing calculators are used to explore algebraic and trigonometric concepts. Transformations of data, graphs and equations include work with polynomials, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. All students must have everyday access to a TI 84 Plus or TI 84 Plus C graphing calculator.

  • Designed for students who have completed Algebra II, but need a more intensive, slower-paced approach to college-prep mathematics

Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Recommendation of math department.

  • Mathematics
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Pre-Calculus

MT 430: This course focuses on the application of algebra and trigonometry to the study of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic and trigonometric functions and their graphs. Special emphasis is given to problem solving, the appropriate use of technology, and skills that are needed for calculus. All students must have everyday access to a TI 84 Plus or TI 84 Plus C graphing calculator.

  • Academic level function analysis and trigonometry for average or above average students

Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, 80 or better in the second semester of Algebra II, Recommendation of math instructor and department chair.

  • Mathematics
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Honors Course
  • Year-Long
Honors Pre-Calculus

MT 435: This course is designed for the student who intends to take a calculus course at the high school or college level. This comprehensive, fast-paced course will integrate concepts and procedures from all previous mathematics courses and incorporate the theory and symbolism, and precision necessary to be successful in higher mathematics. Critical thinking, analysis skills, and application of concepts and procedures are stressed. All students must have everyday access to a TI-84 Plus or TI 84 Plus C graphing calculator.

  • Rigorous coverage of functional and graphical analysis; strong use of graphing calculators
  • Trigonometry, vector operations, sequences and series, statistics and other topics
  • Introduction to college-level calculus, leading to the AP courses

Prerequisites: A minimum of 87 or better in the second semester of Honors Algebra II, or 97 or better in the second semester of Algebra II and a minimum of 87 in the second semester of Honors Geometry. Students enrolling in this course must have the recommendation of the current instructor and the approval of the department chair.

  • Mathematics
  • 11th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Mathematical Models with Applications

MT 432: This course is intended to build on Algebra I and Geometry courses, and to place emphasis on bringing about a deeper understanding of those mathematical relationships that will help students gain greater mathematical literacy and help them build a strong foundation for future study in mathematics [Algebra II] and other disciplines. Use of Graphing Calculator TI 84 Plus or TI 84 Plus C.

  • Designed for students who have completed Algebra I and Geometry but need to strengthen their skills to be successful in Algebra II

Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry and recommendation of the teacher or Department Chair.

  • Mathematics
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Advanced Placement
  • Year-Long
Advanced Placement Calculus AB

MT 440: This Advanced Placement course prepares students to take the Calculus AB

Advanced Placement Examination in the spring semester. Students will explore new concepts and applications related to further college study in science, architecture, engineering, pre-medicine, or business.

  • Completion of Calculus AB is equivalent to a one-semester college course; students are provided the opportunity to take the AP Calculus AB exam

Prerequisites: 80 or better in the second semester of Honors Pre-calculus and/or the approval of the department chair.

  • Mathematics
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Advanced Placement
  • Year-Long
Advanced Placement Calculus BC

MT 445: This advanced placement course prepares students to take the Calculus BC Advanced Placement examination in the spring semester. Students will explore new concepts and applications related to further college study in science, engineering, mathematics or other mathematically-intense fields.

  • Completion of Calculus BC qualifies a student to take the AP Calculus BC examination in the spring semester

Prerequisites: 90 or better in the second semester of Honors Pre-Calculus and approval of the department chair.

  • Mathematics
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Advanced Placement
  • Year-Long
Advanced Placement Statistics

MT 450: This advanced placement course will have students exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference.

  • Completion of Statistics qualifies a student to take the AP Statistics examination in the spring semester

Prerequisites: Honors Algebra II, Pre-Calculus, or Honors Pre-Calculus.

  • Mathematics

Physical Education

  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Physical Education II

PE 952: Physical Education II emphasizes health-related fitness and an appreciation for teamwork and fair play through team sports. Students will gain knowledge of physical activity and health components that may be used throughout life. Students will demonstrate a competency in many movement forms and proficiency in three or more team sports.

  • Students are required to take 1.5 credits of physical education.  Dance, Band, Strength Training and Athletics may fulfill this requirement.
  • Physical Education
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Physical Education I

PE 961: The Physical Education I course emphasizes the importance of continued physical activity and the overall impact it has on life expectancy. Knowledge and skills of movement are acquired to enable the student to pursue a physically active lifestyle and to understand the relationship between physical activity and overall health throughout a life span. The students will explore different styles of exercise and learn the proper etiquette and safety rules of the Weight Room.

Students are required to take 1.5 credits of physical education.  Dance, Band, Strength Training and Athletics may fulfill this requirement.

  • Physical Education
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • 9th Grade
  • Year-Long
Drill Team

PE 953: Pantherettes is a performing, precision dance-drill team. The squad performs at all football games, pep rallies and other major home and away athletic events. They serve as representatives of the school when asked, and participate in state and local competitions.

Prerequisites: Tryouts. Uniform and transportation costs paid by each member.

  • Physical Education
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Health

PE 954: Good health is determined by meeting the physical and emotional needs of the body. This course divides the curriculum into four major areas: knowledge of one’s physical self, knowledge of one’s emotional self, elements which add to one’s health and elements which take away from one’s health. Presenting the facts and allowing the students to make sound decisions based on knowledge rather than myth or hearsay are the crux of this course.

  • All incoming freshmen and transfer students must successfully complete Health for state and school graduation requirements
  • Physical Education
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Physical Education III

PE 959: Students will participate in a range of individual sports selected by the instructor. Students will acquire movement knowledge and skills that provide the foundation for enjoyment and continued social development through physical activity. Student selections of individual sport activities that are enjoyable are a major objective of this course.

  • Students are required to take 1.5 credits of physical education.  Dance, Band, Strength Training and Athletics may fulfill this requirement.
  • Physical Education
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Fall
  • Spring
Athletics— Women

PE 955 & 957: During the course women have the option of participating in the following sports: volleyball, basketball, swimming, track, softball, cross- country, golf, soccer, rugby, lacrosse and tennis. Required during and after school are: practice, competing against other schools, and following the regulations of the Athletic Department.

  • Physical Education
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Fall
  • Spring
Athletics— Men

Athletics— Men

PE 956 & 958: During the course men have the options of participating in the following sports: football, basketball, swimming, track, baseball, cross-country, golf, soccer, rugby, lacrosse and tennis. Required during and after school are: practice, competing against other schools, and following the regulations of the Athletic Department.

  • Physical Education
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Cheerleading

PE 960: The cheerleading squads perform at all football games, pep rallies and other major athletic events. They serve as representatives of the school and participate in competitions.

Prerequisites: Tryouts in spring

  • Physical Education
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Color Guard

PE 962: The Panther guard is a performing color and winter guard team. The team performs at all home games as well pep rallies and other major events. They serve as representatives of the school and as a spirit organization.

  • Physical Education
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
Panther Performance Training Fall - Men

PE 994: Panther Performance Training is an elective course that provides advanced programs in strength and conditioning, mental conditioning, athletic body management, life skills and leadership training. This program uses Olympic lifts and their variations along with other exercises containing plyometric properties, high intensity total body strength building exercises, controlled recovery, movement preparatory exercises, body positioning critique and researched periodization.

  • Develop knowledge, proper technique and safety precautions during activity
  • Develop and increase muscular strength, endurance, power agility and flexibility
  • Understand how other components of weight training, such as cardiovascular endurance, nutrition, flexibility and body composition all relate to a fitness goal
  • Students will increase their self-esteem and feeling of well being
  • Physical Education
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Spring
Panther Performance Training Spring - Men

PE 996: Panther Performance Training is an elective course that provides advanced programs in strength and conditioning, mental conditioning, athletic body management, life skills and leadership training. This program uses Olympic lifts and their variations along with other exercises containing plyometric properties, high intensity total body strength building exercises, controlled recovery, movement preparatory exercises, body positioning critique and researched periodization.

  • Develop knowledge, proper technique and safety precautions during activity
  • Develop and increase muscular strength, endurance, power agility and flexibility
  • Understand how other components of weight training, such as cardiovascular endurance, nutrition, flexibility and body composition all relate to a fitness goal
  • Students will increase their self-esteem and feeling of well being
  • Physical Education
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
Panther Performance Training Fall - Women

PE 995: Panther Performance Training is an elective course that provides advanced programs in strength and conditioning, mental conditioning, athletic body management, life skills and leadership training. This program uses Olympic lifts and their variations along with other exercises containing plyometric properties, high intensity total body strength building exercises, controlled recovery, movement preparatory exercises, body positioning critique and researched periodization.

  • Develop knowledge, proper technique and safety precautions during activity
  • Develop and increase muscular strength, endurance, power agility and flexibility
  • Understand how other components of weight training, such as cardiovascular endurance, nutrition, flexibility and body composition all relate to a fitness goal
  • Students will increase their self-esteem and feeling of well being
  • Physical Education
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Spring
Panther Performance Training Spring - Women

PE 997: Panther Performance Training is an elective course that provides advanced programs in strength and conditioning, mental conditioning, athletic body management, life skills and leadership training. This program uses Olympic lifts and their variations along with other exercises containing plyometric properties, high intensity total body strength building exercises, controlled recovery, movement preparatory exercises, body positioning critique and researched periodization.

  • Develop knowledge, proper technique and safety precautions during activity
  • Develop and increase muscular strength, endurance, power agility and flexibility
  • Understand how other components of weight training, such as cardiovascular endurance, nutrition, flexibility and body composition all relate to a fitness goal
  • Students will increase their self-esteem and feeling of well being
  • Physical Education

Science

  • 10th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Integrated Physics and Chemistry

SC 504: This study of physical science covers the introductory concepts of physics and chemistry. Areas covered include the metric system of measurements, diversity, patterns and interactions of matter, motion, forces, energy, heat energy, electricity, magnetism, and technology.

  • Presents the basic concepts of physics and chemistry
  • Emphasizes application of theoretical concepts in actual laboratory experiments and everyday experiences outside the classroom

Prerequisites: Biology

  • Science
  • 1 Credit
  • 9th Grade
  • Year-Long
Biology I

SC 520: This course covers biological principles necessary to prepare the student for success in college science, while also emphasizing the practical biological concepts important to his/her own life. Course content includes the study of the metric system, molecule, cells, heredity, evolution, organisms, and populations. This foundation will lead to discussion and study of the six kingdoms of life, and will include microbiology and a taxonomic study of plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates with an emphasis on the major systems of the human organism.

  • Presents biological principles with the use of safe laboratory practices
  • Develops a deeper understanding of the characteristics of life
  • Develops awareness of the relationship between living things and the environment and its importance
  • Science
  • 10th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Honors Course
  • Year-Long
Honors Biology I

SC 521: This course provides a more in-depth study of the topics covered in Biology I.  Lab work and vocabulary are more detailed and in-depth compared to the standard course. Individual research and outside reading will be required in order for students to actively contribute to classroom discussions on current topics in the field of Biology.

  • Presents biological principles with the use of safe laboratory practices
  • Develops a deeper understanding of the characteristics of life
  • Develops awareness of the relationship between living things and the environment and its importance

Prerequisites: Entrance examination score at or above 90% and recommendation of the Science Department.

  • Science
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Advanced Placement
  • Year-Long
Advanced Placement Biology

SC 522: This course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory biology courses and includes topics and labs covered for biology majors. It aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology.  Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of concepts rather than on memorizing terms and technical details. Study of three major topic areas includes molecules and cells, heredity and evolution, and organisms and populations.  The course will prepare students to take the AP Biology Examination in the spring. Students will be required to spend extra time outside of regular classroom hours to complete labs and projects in order to complete this course. These times may be scheduled before or after school hours depending on scheduling.

  • Challenges students to develop a conceptual framework for applying their knowledge of biology and critical thinking skills
  • Follows the themes of biology put forth by the College Board
  • Develops the student's appreciation of science as a process

Prerequisites: 90 or above in College Preparatory Biology and College Preparatory Chemistry; 80 or above in Honors Chemistry; and recommendation of Science Department

  • Science
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Chemistry I

SC 530: This course provides a solid foundation of concepts and skills to prepare students for chemistry at the college level. Students are challenged to develop and use critical thinking and problem solving skills.   The unifying theme relating all topics is that the properties of matter are a consequence of their structure. Laboratory experiences challenge the student to apply theoretical concepts to relate them to real world phenomenon. Areas covered include measurement and calculations, classification of matter, matter-energy relationships, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, the mole concept, formula calculations, solutions, and acids and bases.

  • Presents a systematic development of basic chemistry principles
  • Emphasizes problem solving and critical thinking skills
  • Relates and applies laboratory experimentation to real world experiences

Prerequisites: Current enrollment in Algebra II and teacher recommendation.

  • Science
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Honors Course
  • Year-Long
Honors Chemistry I

SC 531: This is a challenging course that will prepare students interested in pursuing a career in a scientific field. It is  designed for students with strong science reasoning ability and work ethics Areas covered include principles of matter-energy relationships, classification of matter, the mole concept, formula calculations, periodicity, atomic and molecular structures, solubility, acids and bases, equilibrium, and organic chemistry.

  • Presents a systematic development of basic chemistry principles
  • Emphasizes problem solving and critical thinking skills
  • Relates and applies laboratory experimentation to real world experiences

Prerequisites: An 85 or above in Honors Biology; 95 or above in Biology and placement in Honors Geometry or Honors Algebra II; and teacher recommendation.

  • Science
  • 10th Grade
  • 11th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Conceptual Chemistry

SC 532: This course covers the concepts and skills of high school chemistry. It develops skills and understanding of the principles fundamental to the field of chemistry. While covering the traditional topics in Chemistry, it provides a flexible curriculum that addresses the needs of students.

  • Presents a systematic development of basic chemistry principles
  • Emphasizes problem solving and critical thinking skills
  • Relates and applies laboratory experimentation to real world experiences

Prerequisites: Juniors: Geometry, a 75 or above in IPC, and teacher recommendation. Seniors: 80 or above in Environmental Science and concurrent enrollment in Algebra II.

  • Science
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Advanced Placement
  • Year-Long
Advanced Placement Chemistry

SC 535: The AP Chemistry course provides students with a college-level foundation to support future advanced course work in chemistry. Students cultivate their understanding of chemistry through inquiry-based investigations, as they explore topics such as: atomic structure, intermolecular forces and bonding, chemical reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, and equilibrium. Created by the AP Chemistry Development Committee, the course curriculum is compatible with many Chemistry courses in colleges and universities.

  • A second year chemistry course designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course typically taken in the first year of college
  • Structured around the AP Chemistry curriculum framework provided by the College Board
  • Emphasis placed on the seven science aspects that capture important aspects of the work that scientists engage in, with learning objectives that combine content with inquiry and reasoning skills

Prerequisites: 85 or better in Honors Chemistry or 90 or better in Chemistry I; 90 or better in Honors Geometry or Algebra II; teacher recommendation

  • Science
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Physics

SC 552: Physics 1 is an Algebra-based, college prep-level physics course that explores topics such as motion Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum), work, energy, power, mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electric circuits. It will promote critical thinking skills and scientific reasoning through guided inquiry and problem solving.

  • An introduction to core scientific principles and processes that provide a better understanding of the physical world
  • A problem-solving approach using 21st century techniques

Prerequisites: A minimum 75 in Chemistry or a minimum of 90 in Conceptual Chemistry and teacher recommendation.

  • Science
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Conceptual Physics

SC 554: Conceptual Physics explores topics such as motion Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum), work, energy, power, mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electric circuits. It will promote critical thinking skills and scientific reasoning through guided inquiry and problem solving.

  • An introduction to core scientific principles and processes that provide a better understanding of the physical world
  • A problem-solving approach using 21st century techniques

Prerequisites: 75 or above in Conceptual Chemistry; Chemistry; and concurrent enrollment in Algebra II or College Algebra; and teacher recommendation.

  • Science
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Advanced Placement
  • Year-Long
Advanced Placement Physics

SC 556: AP Physics 1 is an Algebra-based, introductory college-level course that explores topics such as motion Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum), work, energy, power, mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electric circuits. It will promote critical thinking skills and scientific reasoning and develop independent learners through inquiry.

  • An introduction to core scientific principles and processes that provide a better understanding of the physical world
  • A problem-solving approach using 21st century techniques

Prerequisites: Chemistry or Honors Chemistry, and previous or concurrent enrollment in Honors Pre-calculus or AP Calculus and teacher recommendation.

  • Science
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Advanced Placement
  • Year-Long
Advanced Placement Physics II

SC 557: AP Physics 2 is an Algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course that explores topics such as fluid statics and dynamics; thermodynamics with kinetic theory; PV diagrams and probability; electrostatics; electric circuits with capacitors; magnetic fields; electromagnetisms; physical and geometric optics; and quantum, atomic, and nuclear physics.

  • An introduction to core scientific principles and processes that provide a better understanding of the physical world
  • A problem-solving approach using 21st century techniques

Prerequisites: Completion of AP Physics 1 or a 90 or above in Physics I and teacher recommendation.

  • Science
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
Environmental Science I

SC 568: This course includes the study of natural resources, biodiversity, and ecology. Topics include the flow of energy in ecosystems and biomes, the study of populations and how they change and interact, and the organizations of life. Students are introduced to science and the environment and will explore the scientific method, statistics, and models in order to make informed decisions about issues that affect the environment.

  • Explores a variety of energy resources available to living things
  • Emphasizes the interaction between humans and their surroundings
  • Emphasizes current issues in environmental awareness
  • Appropriate for students to take as an elective prior to/or in place of chemistry

Prerequisites: Biology and a second credit of science

  • Science
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Spring
Environmental Science II

SC 569: This course includes the study of energy, pollution, and natural disasters as they impact the environment. Topics include environmental interrelationships and ethics, land use planning, agricultural methods, and the effect of greenhouse gases on climate change, water management and pollution, air pollution, waste management, alternative energy sources, and environmental policy and decision-making.

  • Explores a variety of energy resources available to living things
  • Emphasizes the interaction between humans and their surroundings
  • Emphasizes current issues in environmental awareness
  • Appropriate for students to take as an elective prior to/or in place of chemistry

Prerequisites: Biology, and a second credit of science

  • Science
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Earth and Space Science

SC 570: This course will focus on three major science concepts: Earth in Space and Time, Solid Earth, and Fluid Earth.  Course content includes geology, oceanography, meteorology, environmental science, and astronomy. Students will study the origin, evolution, and properties of the integrated Earth and planetary systems. Using a chronological framework and a systems approach, students will increase their knowledge of the dynamics of Earth and space using data, models, and observations over time.

  • Presents the Earth as a complex system of interacting rock, water, air and life
  • Emphasizes the Earth as a continuously changing environment
  • Develops an understanding of the orbits and other objects in the solar system

Prerequisites: Biology, Integrated Physics & Chemistry, & a third year of science.

  • Science
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Forensic Science

SC 575: This course provides a structured and scientific approach to the investigation of crimes of assault, abuse and neglect, domestic violence, accidental death, homicide and the psychology of criminal behavior. Students will learn terminology and investigative procedures related to crime scenes, questioning, interviewing, criminal behavior characteristics, truth detection and scientific procedures used to solve crimes. Using scientific methods students will collect and analyze evidence through case studies and simulated crime scenes. Methods will include fingerprint analysis, ballistics, blood spatter analysis and DNA testing. Students will learn the history, legal aspects and career options for forensic science.

  • Presents the history of forensic sciences and its present role in society
  • Addresses the methodology of collecting and interpreting data related to a crime scene

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Chemistry I or a grade of 75 or higher in Conceptual Chemistry. Students must also have successfully completed Algebra II or be currently enrolled in Algebra II and teacher recommendation.

  • Science
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Engineering Your World II

SC 581: Engineering Applications of Computer Science – comprises a combination of project-based, socially relevant design challenges and explorations that introduce students to key computing principles in the context of engineering. Students employ engineering processes, skills, and habits of mind to solve more complex challenges that rely on the computing, programming, data representation and analysis, algorithmic thinking, and modeling skills that are required for engineering. This course builds on the skills set in year one. Students will be working in a project based environment to prepare them for a career in an engineering field, train them to think like an engineer, and develop their abilities to complete collegiate level work in the structured environment of an SPX classroom. Dual-enrollment course with University of Texas, Austin.

Prerequisites: Engineering Your World I and teacher recommendation.

  • Science
  • 11th Grade
  • 12th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Engineering Your World I

SC 580: Engineering Design and Analysis -This course is designed to build 21st century skills, critical thinking and problem solving, communication and collaboration. Students will be working in a project based environment developing skills to prepare them for a career in an engineering field, train them to think like an engineer, and develop their abilities to complete collegiate level work in the structured environment of an SPX classroom. Dual-enrollment course with University of Texas, Austin.

  • Designed by the faculty from the Cockrell School of Engineering at the University of Texas and NASA, the course exposes students to a variety of engineering disciplines and skills
  • Engages students in authentic engineering practices in a project-based learning (PBL) environment
  • Learning is scaffolded into a series of engaging, socially relevant explorations and design challenges
  • Students will learn engineering design skills, develop engineering habits of mind and explore engineering fields and professions

Prerequisites: Either IPC, Physics or Algebra I and teacher recommendation.

  • Science

Social Studies

  • 11th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
U.S. History

SS 600: This course studies a time period of the pre-civil war in America to the current administration of President Trump. It explores in depth the various presidencies and policies that affected the United States during key times of the nation’s development. Students will study the major wars and their impact on the American people. The course content also explores the issues of poverty, immigration, economic and social movements and justice issues throughout the nation’s history. Students will be introduced to the social history of the nation including the trends and fads of the generations.

  • Primary focus on a general overview of American history
  • Covers the foundations of the American nation, the Civil War and Western expansion
  • Social Studies
  • 11th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Advanced Placement
  • Year-Long
Advanced Placement U.S. History

SS 605: The course covers the periods of exploration and colonization to 1763, the Revolutionary era, Constitutional Government, the Jefferson and Jacksonian periods, the split between the North and South, domestic America, and the Imperial Republic during the first semester. The second semester includes the study of the Progressive Movement, World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, and current history. Several texts, outside reading assignments, tables, charts, maps and graph analysis assist students with in-depth, comprehensive coverage of the events of American history.

  • Primary focus on a general overview of American history
  • Covers the foundations of the American nation, the Civil War and Western expansion
  • Preparation for the AP Exam in Advanced Placement Course

Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation from Honors World History or World History and from the Social Studies Department Chair

  • Social Studies
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • Dual Credit
  • Year-Long
U.S. History Dual Credit

SS 610: This course provides college-level instruction of U.S. history from Pre-Contact Societies through Reconstruction in the fall and U.S. history from 1877 to present in the spring. The course is taught by a St. Pius X faculty member. It requires college level reading and writing ability. Completion of this course earning a “C” or above will earn students 3 hours of college credit which is reflected on the HCC transcript or other college transcript that the school may use for this course. The course also fulfills the requirement of ½ credit of U.S. Government for graduation. The course is scheduled during the regular high school hours on the SPX campus. Students living within Houston Community College District – no fee. Students living outside the district pay an additional fee to the college.

  • Primary focus on a general overview of American history
  • Covers the foundations of the American nation, the Civil War and Western expansion
  • College Credit given for Dual Credit U.S. History and Advanced Placement Courses

Prerequisites: ACT Composite score 23 or above with minimum of 19 in English or SAT Composite score 1070 with a minimum of 500 in Critical Reading or qualifying score on Asset test. Qualified students may take a maximum of 6 hours of college credit per semester

  • Social Studies
  • 1 Credit
  • 9th Grade
  • Year-Long
Ancient World History and Geography

SS 632: This course is a study of the history of the world, and its impact on the present time. It also includes study of the development of cultures, social groupings, activities, technologies, means of communication, and world views. The course seeks to develop skills, attitudes, and behaviors that will enable students to function as effective citizens in a changing world. The course will start with the beginnings of civilization and end with the Middle Ages. Major topics include: civilizations of Egypt, China, Greece, Rome, and Africa; major historical periods such as the Middle Ages, the Age of Exploration, and European Colonization.

  • Covers the beginnings of human history and ends with topics related to the Enlightenment
  • Centers on key geographic concepts
  • Emphasis on higher level thinking and writing skills
  • Social Studies
  • 10th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Year-Long
Modern World History and Geography

SS 633: This course is a study of the history of the world, and its impact on the present time. It also includes study of the development of cultures, social groupings, activities, technologies, means of communication, and world views. The course seeks to develop skills, attitudes, and behaviors that will enable students to function as effective citizens in a changing world. The course will start with the Enlightenment and Scientific Revolution and end with modern times. Major topics include: the French Revolution, WWI, WWII, The Cold War, The Korean War, Vietnam, The Gulf War, and the War in Afghanistan.

  • Covers the 1500s and ends with topics related to the modern world
  • Studies the philosophies of different cultures and world religions
  • Highlights major world migrations
  • Describes social movements

Prerequisites: Ancient World History and Geography

  • Social Studies
  • 1 Credit
  • 9th Grade
  • Honors Course
  • Year-Long
Honors Ancient World History and Geography

SS 634: The course will start with the establishment of the earliest civilizations. These will include the civilizations of Egypt, India, China, Greece, Rome, and Africa through the Middle-Ages. This course is designed for those students with a strong interest in social studies and world events. It is a thorough appraisal of world cultures, geography, history, religion and art and concentrates on analysis of the reasons behind historical events.

  • Covers the beginnings of human history and ends with topics related to the Enlightenment
  • Centers on key geographic concepts
  • Emphasis on higher level thinking and writing skills

Prerequisites: Teacher and Department Chair recommendation

  • Social Studies
  • 10th Grade
  • 1 Credit
  • Honors Course
  • Year-Long
Honors Modern World History and Geography

SS 635: This course begins with the Age of Exploration and Colonization and continues with study of major political, economic, social, and military events through current days. This course is designed for those who have a strong interest in social studies and world events. It is a fast paced appraisal of culture, geography, economic and political development, history, religion and art throughout the world.

  • Covers the 1500’s and ends with topics related to the modern world
  • Studies the philosophies of different cultures and world religions
  • Highlights major world migrations
  • Describes social movements

Prerequisites: Recommendation of department

  • Social Studies
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
U.S. Government

SS 640: This course examines the principles and beliefs upon which the United States was founded and the structure, functions and powers of government at the national, state and local levels. Students learn major political ideas and forms of government in history. A significant focus on the course is on the U.S. Constitution, its underlying principles and ideas, and the form of government it created. Students analyze major concepts of republicanism, federalism, checks and balances, separation of powers, popular sovereignty, and individual rights and compare the U.S. system of government with other political systems. Students analyze the impact of individuals, political parties, interest groups, and the media on the American political system, evaluate the importance of voluntary individual participation in a democratic society, and analyze the rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution. Students examine the relationship between governmental policies and the culture of the United States.

  • Primary focus on a general overview of American history
  • Covers the foundations of the American nation, the Civil War and Western expansion

Prerequisites: U.S. History, World History

  • Social Studies
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Dual Credit
  • Year-Long
U.S. Government Dual Credit

SS 641: This course provides college level instruction in American Government. The syllabus follows the Houston Community College syllabi for American Government. The course is taught by a St. Pius X faculty member. It requires college level reading and writing ability. Completion of this course earning a “C” or above will earn students 3 hours of college credit which is reflected on the HCC transcript or other college transcript that the school may use for this course. The course also fulfills the requirement of ½ credit of U.S. Government for graduation. The course is scheduled during the regular high school hours on the SPX campus. Students living within Houston Community College District – no fee. Students living outside the district pay an additional fee to the college.

  • Primary focus on a general overview of American history
  • Covers the foundations of the American nation, the Civil War and Western expansion
  • College Credit given for Dual Credit U.S. History and Advanced Placement Courses

Prerequisites: ACT Composite score 23 or above with minimum of 19 in English or SAT Composite score 1070 with a minimum of 500 in Critical Reading or qualifying score on Asset test. Qualified students may take a maximum of 6 hours of college credit per semester.

  • Social Studies
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Advanced Placement
  • Spring
Advanced Placement U.S. Government and Politics

SS 642: This course is designed to conform to the general standards of the Advanced Placement Program and the study of political behavior. It stresses the study of both general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples. Special emphasis is placed on the use of cases that describe the activities of citizens and political decision-makers, thus emphasizing an analytical approach to the three branches of government, the federal bureaucracy, and the various unofficial political specialists. Students must have a keen interest in government, politics, current events, and elections.

  • Primary focus on a general overview of American history
  • Covers the foundations of the American nation, the Civil War and Western expansion
  • Preparation for the AP Exam in Advanced Placement Course

Prerequisites: 90 or better in AP U.S. History and AP English III or 98 in U.S. History and English III and permission of teacher. Must also be enrolled in Honors Economics

  • Social Studies
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Economics

SS 645: The focus of this course is on the basic principles concerning production, consumption, and distribution of goods and services in the United States and a comparison with those in other countries around the world. Students examine the rights and responsibilities of consumers and business. Students analyze the interaction of supply, demand, and price and study the role of financial institutions in a free enterprise system. Types of business ownership and market structures are discussed, as are basic concepts of consumer economics. The impact of a variety of factors including geography, the federal government, economic ideas from important philosophers and historic documents, societal values, and technological innovations on the national economy and economic policy is an integral part of the course.

  • Study of supply and demand, business cycles and  government policy
  • Simulations with budgets and evaluation of practical living experiences
  • Examination of investment decisions that includes a stock market simulation

Prerequisites: U.S. History, World History

  • Social Studies
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Honors Course
Honors Economics

SS 646: This course is open to Honors students who demonstrate proficiency in mathematics and English. It provides students with an opportunity to thoroughly examine the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision-makers, both consumers and producers, with the larger economic system. It places emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets, and includes the study of factor markets and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. In the second quarter, particular emphasis is given to the study of national income and students should become familiar with economic performance measures, economic growth, and international economics. The course concludes with students investigating a problem, issue, or concern; researching the topic using a variety of technologies; and presenting a product of professional quality.

  • Study of supply and demand, business cycles and  government policy
  • Simulations with budgets and evaluation of practical living experiences
  • Examination of investment decisions that includes a stock market simulation

Prerequisites: 90 or better in AP U.S. History and AP English III or 98 in U.S. History and English III and permission of the teacher. Must also be enrolled in Advanced Placement U.S. Government and Politics.

  • Social Studies
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Psychology I

SS 656: An introduction to psychology with focus on the history, current issues and future of psychology, psychological research, child development, learning theory, intelligence, memory and thought, sensation, perception, motivation and emotion. The course also includes a study of the brain and nervous system.

  • Presentation of basic psychological concepts and important contributors to the field
  • Promotion of self-understanding
  • Study of specific theories related to abnormal human behavior
  • Focus on multiple personality disorder, schizophrenia, depression and other disorders

Prerequisites: Approval of the instructor

  • Social Studies
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Psychology II

SS 657: Primary focus is on abnormal behavior and its treatment, altered states of consciousness, group psychology, stress and the study of infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age. A large part of the course deals with simple experimentation and the writing of lab analyses.

  • Presentation of basic psychological concepts and important contributors to the field
  • Promotion of self-understanding
  • Study of specific theories related to abnormal human behavior
  • Focus on multiple personality disorder, schizophrenia, depression and other disorders

Prerequisites: Approval of instructo

  • Social Studies
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Introduction to Sociology

SS 670: This course introduces students to sociology. This course combines a look at the American mainstream and contrasts it with sub-cultures and elements of diversity within our nation. Students investigate change and peoples’ ability to deal with change. Students develop tools to evaluate where our society has been and its trek into the future. Students examine topics of current importance such as child abuse, alcoholism, racism, the women’s movement, and religion. Mass media and other popular structures of society such as art and fads will be examined. Students will be better able to understand the problems and complexities of current and future society. Students will gain exposure to art, culture, religion, mass media, and current events.

  • Study of the structures in society with special emphasis on social justice issues
  • Social Studies

Theology

  • 1/2 Credit
  • 9th Grade
  • Fall
Revelation and Scripture

TH 112: The first semester of Theology I provides an introduction to divine revelation found in Scripture and the role of the Church in handing this on. While the focus is on the Old Testament, the course also contains the essential content of the Gospels and introduces basic Church documents. The course includes local units on the SPX Mission and human sexuality/adolescent life.

  • The nature of God’s self-revelation to humankind
  •  The role of the Church in handing-on and teaching revealed truth
  • General nature of the Scriptures and skills of using the Bible
  • The Scriptural focus on the Gospels and the person of Jesus Christ
  • Theology
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 9th Grade
  • Spring
Jesus’ Mission and Ministry

TH 112: The second semester course examines the essential content of the Gospels – the life and ministry of Jesus and the Paschal Mystery. The course is designed to uncover Jesus’ mission and ministry while emphasizing His teaching about God the Father, the Trinity, Mary, and the Holy Spirit.

  • Theology
  • 10th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • Fall
Jesus Christ-Redeemer

TH 112: The second semester course examines the essential content of the Gospels – the life and ministry of Jesus and the Paschal Mystery. The course is designed to uncover Jesus’ mission and ministry while emphasizing His teaching about God the Father, the Trinity, Mary, and the Holy Spirit.

  • Theology
  • 10th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • Spring
Jesus Christ in the Church

TH 122: The Catholic Church is rooted in Jesus Christ and the earliest apostolic community. The nature of the Church is revealed by its four theological works, its institutional presence and its mission to evangelize all nations.

Prerequisites: Theology I

  • Theology
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • Fall
Sacraments – Privileged Encounters with Jesus Christ

TH 131: This course will help students understand how we encounter Christ today in a full and real way through the Sacraments and liturgy of the Church, especially in the Eucharist. Students will examine the reflections of daily life found in each of the Sacraments, so that the encounter with Christ is viewed in its full and lived context.

  • The Sacramental nature of the Church
  • The Sacraments of Initiation, Healing and Community in Christ
  • Challenges of living the Sacraments today

Prerequisites: Theology I & II

  • Theology
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • Spring
Morality - Life in Jesus Christ

TH 131: This course focuses on the essential message of Christ’s moral teaching, the importance of love of God and love of neighbor. It is presented in a way that is clearly applicable to the lives of today’s teenagers. The course has an important task – to teach Catholic morality in a contemporary culture where religious indifference is high, where human rights are often violated, and where there is a diminished moral reference throughout political and social life.

  • What does God call us to do?
  • The Commandments as the basis of Christian moral teaching
  • The fullness of moral living in Jesus Christ: Gospel morality
  • The basis of Conscience, Sin and Forgiveness

Prerequisites: Theology I & II

  • Theology
  • 11th Grade
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
  • Fall
  • Spring
Christian Service Learning Program

TH 135: This independent study course enables students to engage in direct social service to those with need through awareness and praxis. In this course, students serve in an approved social service agency for 100 hours of service learning and justice outreach completed independently outside of regular school hours. The service experience is enhanced through adequate formation, prayer and reflection, awareness activities, guidance, discernment, and small group meetings. This course runs from the second semester junior year through fall semester senior year.

Prerequisites: Second semester junior standing

  • Theology
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
Social and Moral Issues

TH 147: The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the Church’s social teaching. In this course, students are to learn how Christ’s concern for others, especially the poor and needy, is present today in the Church’s social teaching and mission.

Prerequisites: Theology I, II, and III

  • Theology
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
Christian Vocations: Life, Love and Service

TH 151: The purpose of this course is to help students to understand the vocations of life: how Christ calls us to live. In this course, students should learn how all vocations are similar and how they differ. The course should be structured around married life, single life, priestly life, and consecrated life. Students should learn what it means to live life for the benefit of others and the value in considering a vocation in service to the Christian community.

Prerequisites: Theology I, II, and III

  • Theology
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
Sacred Scripture

TH 153: The purpose of this course is to give an overview of Sacred Scripture with an introduction to the basic principles for understanding and interpreting the Bible. Given the limits of a semester of study, it will not be possible to introduce all the books of the Bible, but every effort is made to project a sense of the unity of the narrative for the divine plan of salvation, the presence of God’s action in the record of Revelation, and God’s desire to share merciful love with us. “All scripture is inspired by God and is useful for teaching, for refutation, for correction and for training in righteousness, so that one who belongs to God may be competent, equipped for every good work” (2 Tim 3:14-17).

  • A mature overview of Sacred Scriptures, emphasizing the unity of theme – salvation history – that unifies the Biblical books.
  • Introduction to the basic principles for interpreting Scripture

Prerequisites: Theology I, II, and III

  • Theology
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
Church History

TH 154: Course Four presented a catechesis of the Church and the Body of Christ in history: its nature and meaning, images, marks, life and ministry, guide to moral life, and the role of prayer. This elective can supplement that catechesis on the Church. The purpose of this course is to supply the students with knowledge of the eras, issues, tragedies and triumphs of Church’s history from apostolic times to present. They will be introduced to the fact that the Church was founded by Christ through the Apostles and is sustained by Him throughout history through the Holy Spirit. The students will come to know that the Church is the living Body of Christ today and, as such, has both divine and human elements. Students will learn about the Church’s 2,000 years of history and about how the Church is lead and governed by the successors of the Apostles.

  • A general study of the development of the Church, and its response to the crises and challenges of its history.
  •  Examination and discussion of the Church's continuity with its foundations in the call of Jesus Christ and the values of the first Christian community.
  • Discussion of our calling, as modern Christians and heirs to tradition, to be part of the great drama of salvation.

Prerequisites: Theology I, II, and III

  • Theology
  • 1/2 Credit
  • 12th Grade
Ecumenical Issues

TH 155: This course continues the foundation laid in the previous six courses, comparing the teaching of the Catholic Church to other traditions, both Christian and Non-Christian, with the goal of increasing human unity through fostering awareness of the great spiritual truths which are found in these other communities as well as understanding the ways in which we differ.

  • A comparative study of the teachings of the world's major religious traditions in the light of our Christian sense of the oneness of Truth.
  • Examination of the past, present and future of interreligious relations in our world.
  • Identification of particular issues of religious tension in the world, and potential solutions to these as suggested by Catholic teachings on tolerance and dialogue.

Prerequisites: Theology I, II, and III

  • Theology