Summer 2017

summer school classes

St. Pius X High School offers the following summers school classes:

Digital Photography

Learn how to use your digital camera, improve your composition and edit photos using Adobe Photoshop.

Math Credit Recovery

Recover credit for math classes at SPX. Earn ½ credit.

 

Standardized Test Prep

Review skills and learn strategies for success on the PSAT, ACT and SAT college entrance tests. Earn ½ credit.

Summer School Credit Recovery Programs

  1. St. Pius X High School (NCAA approved) Math credit recovery only | See more info above.
  2. HISD District Wide (NCAA approved)
  3. Houston Community College Adult High School Program (NOT NCAA approved)
  4. St. Thomas High School (NCAA approved)
  5. Strake Jesuit High School (NCAA approved)
  6. Memorial Private High School (NOT NCAA approved)

SUMMER reading

    9th Grade

    View a printable PDF.

    St. Pius X High School requires that all students read during the summer months in order to

    • improve vocabulary
    • increase reading speed and fluency
    • improve performance on college entrance exams
    • promote reading as a life-long activity

    Students will be assessed to demonstrate completion of this requirement. Please check below for appropriate titles for the level of English in which the student has been enrolled. English I students will discuss the novel in class and demonstrate their understanding on a quiz in August 2017. Honors English I students will be tested on GILGAMESH: A VERSE NARRATIVE and THE CHOSEN in August 2017.

    English I:

     

    THE HOUSE ON MANGO STREET by Sandra Cisneros

    This novella tells the story of Esperanza Cordero, a young Latina girl growing up in an impoverished Chicago neighborhood. Through short stories called vignettes, Esperanza recalls the stories of her neighbors and family as well as her own experiences and observations. The stories are often told out of order and often are not resolved – allowing the reader to decide what happens next. Despite dealing with serious issues, the novella uses humor to give perspective and lighten the mood.

    While you are reading your book, you should annotate it. This means writing in the margins of the book when you notice something, and summarize each of the vignettes (that’s what a super-short short story is called) by telling yourself what happened in 2-4 sentences. This will help you when you come to school in the fall, because you will take a quiz over what happened in the book, and you will be writing a creative writing piece as well. The creative writing piece will be your way to introduce yourself to your English teacher.

    The book should be read before the beginning of school, August 14th, and you should be ready to talk about the book on that first day.

     

    Honors English I:.

     

    THE CHOSEN by Chaim Potok

    The odyssey of two young men from boyhood to manhood against the background of conflicts and traditions of Hasidic and Orthodox Jews

    GILGAMESH: A VERSE NARRATIVE by Herbert Mason (Translator)

    The Gilgamesh epic tells of the various adventures of a hero-king, including his quest for immortality and an account of a great flood similar to many details to the Old Testament’s story of Noah.

    10th Grade

    View a printable PDF.

    English II [choose one]

    The House of the Scorpion by Nancy Farmer

    Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

    Does My Head Look Big in This? by Randa Abdel-Fattah

    Annotate and highlight key phrases in the text. You will need to be able to find information/quotations for the creative writing assignment you will be given the first week of school.

    11th Grade

    View a printable PDF.

    English III and English III Challenging Americans students will choose one of the following:

    The Glass Castle by Jeanette Walls **OR**

    Same Kind of Different as Me by Ron Hall

    Students will then complete a dialectical journal that must be typed and brought to class on August 14th, 2017

    The “dialectic” was the method Socrates used to teach his students how to be actively engaged in the struggle to derive meaning from an unfamiliar and challenging work. In a dialectical journal, students divide their paper into two columns. One column is labeled TEXT; the other, RESPONSE. As you read, identify certain passages that cause you to stop and respond to what you are reading.

    Example [Students may vary the format but not the required content]

    Life of Pi by Yann Martel

    TEXT (2 points)

    1. “My suffering left me sad and gloomy. Academic study and the steady, mindful practice of religion slowly brought me back to life. I have kept up what some people would consider my strange religious practices. After one year of high school, I attended the University of Toronto and took a double-major Bachelor’s degree. My majors were religious studies and zoology” (Martel 3).

    RESPONSE (2 points)

    1. What a puzzling opening line! What “suffering”? It makes me curious immediately. The narrator follows this statement with the solution to the problem of “suffering”: religion. OK, as a devout Catholic, I understand the comfort of religion, but the narrator further confesses to “strange religious practices.” I do not personally define my religious practices as “strange” so I am even more intrigued. And after only one year of high school, college? The narrator must be brilliant. The final coup de grace is the combined majors of religious studies and zoology, such a bizarre combination! The first chapter of a novel should provide the reader with the basics: introduce protagonist, establish setting and time, and grab reader’s attention with problem or conflict. OK, Yann Martel, you’ve got my attention… (128 words)

    You will use this model to create your dialectical journal, and your teacher will use this model to evaluate your work. Please notice in the TEXT column you cite verbatim/word-for-word/direct quote passages from the novel and include quotation marks and page numbers according to MLA format. This document must be TYPED and PRINTED.

    For the RESPONSE column, you have several ways to respond to a text:

    1. Raise questions about the beliefs and values implied in the text;
    2. Give your personal reactions to the passage;
    3. Discuss the words, ideas, or actions of the author or characters;
    4. Tell what it reminds you of from your own experience or from other literature you have read;
    5. Write about what it makes you think or feel;
    6. Argue with or speak to the characters or author.

    Please DO NOT simply summarize what you are reading. We want you to become an ACTIVE reader where you are responding to the text.

    You are required to have at least twenty-five (25) passages with corresponding responses. Be sure the twenty-five passages are representative of the entire book. In other words, twenty-five passages taken only from the first few chapters or even the last few chapters will not be acceptable.

    Each text and response combination will be worth (4) points for a total of 100 points for this assignment which will count as a test grade.

    • Points will be deducted on the TEXT side for failure to document accurately and completing according to the sample provided.
    • Points will be deducted on the response side for superficiality, vagueness, or incompleteness.

    Each response must be at least 60 words in length. The WORD COUNT must be listed in the journal response.

    Dialectical Journals are due the first day of class, August 14th, 2017. Failure to do this assignment may result in failing the quarter.


    English III Challenging Americans

    **Challenging Americans Students will also read and complete a 2nd dialectical journal:

    The Devil’s Highway: A True Story by Luis Alberto Urrea

    Complete a second dialectical journal over this book with 16 total passages and corresponding responses, one from each chapter. Follow the same instructions from above.

    Both Dialectical Journals are due the first day of class, August 14th, 2017. Failure to do this assignment may result in dismissal from the class.

     

    AP English III

    AP English III students will read the following:

    1. THE OTHER WES MOORE: ONE NAME, TWO FATES by Wes Moore

    *A typed Character Bone Structure will be assigned at the beginning of school. Annotate this book!

    2. THE DEVIL’S HIGHWAY: A TRUE STORY by Luis Alberto Urrea

    *A typed Dialectical Journal will be due the first day of school, August 14th, 2017, or you may be dropped from the class.

    For information regarding the assignment students are required to complete during the summer, click here.

    3. OUTLIERS: THE STORY OF SUCCESS by Malcolm Gladwell

    *A typed 500-1000 word essay in 12 point Times New Roman with a Works Cited page is due the first day of school, August 14, 2017, or you may be dropped from the class

    The Devil’s Highway by Luis Alberto Urrea Assignment

     

    In a dialectical journal, students divide their paper into two columns. One column is labeled TEXT; the other, RESPONSE. As you read, identify certain passages that cause you to stop and respond to what you are reading.

    Example [Students may vary the format but not the required content]

    Life of Pi by Yann Martel

    TEXT (2 points)

    1. “My suffering left me sad and gloomy. Academic study and the steady, mindful practice of religion slowly brought me back to life. I have kept up what some people would consider my strange religious practices. After one year of high school, I attended the University of Toronto and took a double-major Bachelor’s degree. My majors were religious studies and zoology” (Martel 3).

    RESPONSE (2 points)

    1. What a puzzling opening line! What “suffering”? It makes me curious immediately. The narrator follows this statement with the solution to the problem of “suffering”: religion. OK, as a devout Catholic, I understand the comfort of religion, but the narrator further confesses to “strange religious practices.” I do not personally define my religious practices as “strange” so I am even more intrigued. And after only one year of high school, college? The narrator must be brilliant. The final coup de grace is the combined majors of religious studies and zoology, such a bizarre combination! The first chapter of a novel should provide the reader with the basics: introduce protagonist, establish setting and time, and grab reader’s attention with problem or conflict. OK, Yann Martel, you’ve got my attention… (128 words)

    You will use this model to create your dialectical journal, and your teacher will use this model to evaluate your work. Please notice in the TEXT column you cite verbatim/word-for-word/direct quote passages from the novel and include quotation marks and page numbers according to MLA format. This document must be TYPED and PRINTED.

    For the RESPONSE column, you have several ways to respond to a text:

    1. Raise questions about the beliefs and values implied in the text;
    2. Give your personal reactions to the passage;
    3. Discuss the words, ideas, or actions of the author or characters;
    4. Tell what it reminds you of from your own experience or from other literature you have read;
    5. Write about what it makes you think or feel;
    6. Argue with or speak to the characters or author.

    Please DO NOT simply summarize what you are reading. We want you to become an ACTIVE reader where you are responding to the text.

    Students are required to select one passage of their own choosing for each of the 16 chapters and provide an analytical response for each passage. Passages should be selected carefully to demonstrate an understanding of the book’s purpose/theme, important characters, symbolism, use of diction for a specific purpose, or other important literary elements.

    • Points will be deducted on the TEXT side for failure to document accurately and completing according to the sample provided.
    • Points will be deducted on the response side for superficiality, vagueness, or incompleteness.

    Each response must be at least 60 words in length. The WORD COUNT must be listed in the journal response.

    OUTLIERS: THE STORY OF SUCCESS assignment

    In his book, Malcom Gladwell argues that “there’s no such thing as a self-made man and that super achievers are successful because of their circumstances, their families, and their appetite for hard work.” To what extent do you agree with Gladwell? In a well-organized five paragraph essay, support your answer with references and examples the book OUTLIERS to support your response.

    Essay Requirements:

    • Essay should be between 500 and 1000 words long. Your Works Cited page does not contribute to your word count.
    • Essay should use at least 3 quotations from the text. Use proper MLA Citation format and include a Works Cited page.
    • Essay must be your original work. NO PLAGIARISM!

    12th Grade

    View a printable PDF.

    English IV (EN 215), English IV Shakespeare (EN 221) and English IV Dual Credit (EN 217)

    Students will read their choice of one of the following:

     

    (Clicking on the title of the book will open up each work’s Amazon.com page.)

     

    Students should prepare to be quizzed on their book selection within the first three days of their return to school in the fall. This quiz will count as a double-quiz grade.

     

    English IV Shakespeare (EN221) Summer Extra Credit Opportunity (PDF)


     

    English IV AP (EN 216)View a printable PDF.

    REQUIRED READING:

     

    Students will read the following books during the summer of 2017 for AP English IV the following fall:

    The Orphan Master’s Son by Adam Johnson

    How to Read English like a Professor by Thomas C. Foster

    The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen

    Students will then complete two (2) writing assignments over the Nguyen and Johnson books.

    ASSIGNMENT ONE: The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen

     

    Students will write a modified book analysis of eight (8) paragraphs: Introduction (thesis statement as last sentence, tied to a theme); Theme; Characterization; Detail; Syntax; Organization; Suitability for AP program; and Conclusion. Each style element should have its own paragraph.

    • Students will begin the analysis with an introductory paragraph that introduces the author, gives several sentences of the plot, and presents a thesis statement based on a theme—a major message that the author expects the reader to recognize, phrased as a statement of the human condition. For example: “man seeks human companionship to fulfil his humanity.” The thesis should be the last sentence in the introduction.

    Students will then base the following 9+ sentence analysis paragraphs on:

    • Theme: sections of the novel that show and emphasize the theme chosen by the students, as well as other themes that may be present. No quotations over 4 lines and use MLA parenthetical documentation. For questions on how to properly document and cite using MLA format, please see: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/.
    • Characterization: overall, how do the characters adhere to the theme of the novel and what role do they play?
    • Detail: sensory passages that enhance the theme of the novel. Address the beginning, the middle, and the end of the novel and how the detail enhances the theme in each section of the book.
    • Syntax: particular sentence structures or patterns that enhance the theme along with any punctuation that adds dimension. Examine syntax used at the beginning, middle, and end of the novel.
    • Organization: how does the manner in which this novel is set up address the theme upon which students have focused? Student examination of organization may depend upon how many sections the student perceives are in the novel.
    • Suitability for the AP program: Students should not base this paragraph on whether they liked or disliked the book. Rather, they should ask whether the book contains multi-level readings that make it suitable for the program (hint: it does). Students should then explain the multiple levels on which this text can and should be engaged.

    ASSIGNMENT TWO: The Orphan Master’s Son by Adam Johnson

    Students will first read Thomas C. Foster’s How to Read Literature like a Professor.

    Students will then write a paper applying 10 ideas from the chapters of Foster’s book to The Orphan Master’s Son. Be specific and identify specifically how Foster’s ideas directly apply to facets of Johnson’s novel. Each idea should be in its own paragraph (so you’ll have at least ten body paragraphs). Paragraphs must be at least eight sentences, and contain a strong topic sentence and 2 concrete details plus relevant, substantive commentary.

    DUE DATE:

    Both papers are due on the first day of class with no exceptions, including all Learning Center students. Please show Mr. Young or Mrs. Gagne this paper by May 26, 2017 before you leave so we can initial it.

    STUDENT AND PARENT SIGNATURES:

    I understand that I (or my child) must turn in both papers on the first day of class, August 14, 2017, of the 2017-2018 school year or risk being dismissed from AP English IV.

    Student’s Name: Date:

    Guardian’s Name: Date:

    Academics Calendar

      • TueSep26 Boys lacrosse parent athlete meeting 6:00 PMThe commons
      • SatSep30 ZAPS PSAT Prep 8:00 AM to 1:30 PM
      • TueOct03 8th Grade Visit 9:00 AM to 11:45 AM
      • WedOct04 CSL Reflection Paper Due 8:00 AM
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